The Balance of Social Change - The Balance of Social Change...

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The Balance of Social ChangeBailey SmithHistory 1378, Section 9Dr. Nancy YoungOctober 21, 2014
The social unrest and injustices prevalent during the Second World War and Cold Warinstilled the importance of a balance between political and social actions to produce a successfulstep towards cultural improvement. Though each national conflict reflected current internationalcrises, evidence suggests that single sided action provides minimal progression; however, that isnot to say that unorganized movements by both parts ensure optimal results. Rather, cooperationand balance between the political and social counterparts of the United States is vital for culturaltransitions after a thorough examination of four key conflicts within the United States duringthese eras: the injustice for the African Americans and Jewish refugees during World War II andthe youth rebellion and motion for gender equality within the Cold War.The scientific law discovered by Sir Isaac Newton that addresses the relationship betweenactions and reactions is a universal idea that is applicable to a wide variety of nonscientifictopics, including society. Within this idea, there is a general acceptance that the in the absence ofaction, there simply cannot be a reaction. The United States government found itself in this verypredicament at the beginning of World War II. As the nation refrained from any involvement inaffairs associated with the current global conflicts, the Jewish inhabitants of Europe desperatelysought political asylum from their impending doom. Many nations, including the United States,declined refuge to this faction, leaving them displaced and panicked. As news of the increasingdemand for Jewish refuge hit the shelves, American Anti-Communist Organizations releasedflyers that promoted the impending dislocation of work upon their arrival, directly proclaiming,“European Jews are now coming to the United States to throw white American workers out ofjobs.” The nation’s officials justified their lack of action with fears of further crippling thewounded economy and causing a social uproar; however, the government and sympatheticcitizens, alike, regretted this position immediately after news of death camps for the trapped
Jewish community surfaced in 1942. This realization galvanized the American desire to forvictory over the Axis powers, but for many Jews, this initiative was far too late. While nationalinterests are always a reasonable component in making decisions, the absence of internationalaction that resulted from the bystander effect resulted in the genocide of innocent individuals. In

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