regeneration - William Vahey Regeneration: Topic question...

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William Vahey Regeneration: Topic question six In her novel Regeneration , Pat Barker uses many motifs, symbols and a lot of irony to keep her readers interested in the story. The most memorable, and thus significant example of irony in this classic takes place within the last few chapters of the book. Dr. Rivers is supposed to treat Siegfried Sassoon, a patient and old friend, for “madness” because he opposes the war. Sassoon, being the patient and the one in need of physiological help, does not change his views on the war; however he indirectly changes the views of Rivers, his doctor. Rivers can be considered as the hero of regeneration, he definitely has the views of one. He has strong views of honor and duty. Rivers feels that it is his duty to support the war effort by helping those who are not strong enough to help themselves. He wants to heal his patients so they can go back to war. He is a very bright man and studied anthropology and researched nerve regeneration. Rivers conducted a five-year
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2008 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Sin during the Spring '08 term at Naval Academy.

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regeneration - William Vahey Regeneration: Topic question...

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