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Education Fact Sheet with Link Information

Education Fact Sheet with Link Information - Education...

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Education Worksheet This is by no means a complete history of funding for education. This is only meant to supplement the Time magazine article “How to Fix No Child Left Behind”. This article is posted under “Links” in Course Tools. How Schools are Funded Schools are funded by citizens and government at the local, state, and federal levels. Local level: At the local level, schools are funded through property taxes. This means that those who own property (a home, land, a corporate building) pay taxes each year on the land or property they own, and a portion of that is used to fund schools. This is why, during election times, citizens vote on school levees—through voting, they announce whether they agree with increasing the taxes on their properties, or keeping the tax the same (called a renewal), depending on the issue that’s on the ballot. Some states rely very heavily on local funding for their schools, others provide much more money to local school systems—it depends on the state. There are many problems with this system of funding. For example, many people who own their homes are reluctant to pay higher taxes because they simply cannot afford it. Others may be able to afford it, but they feel as though funding for schools should come from other sources. That is, they feel as though their hard-earned dollars should stay in their own pockets, and that it is not their responsibility to fund schools, especially when local schools may be performing poorly. These people argue that the system of funding should change in some way—that federal government dollars should be reallocated to our nation’s
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