Lesson Plan 10.14.15 - Lesson Plan 10.14.15 The Haitian...

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Lesson Plan, 10.14.15 The Haitian Revolution, Hegel and the Slave-Master Dialectic, and the Communist Manifesto I. Haitian Revolution Review the Revolution in brief. What were the causes? What were the effects? Now, what does Susan Buck-Morss consider an overlooked effect of the Haitian Revolution? Review the article “Hegel and Haiti.” o Q: What is the deeply significant contradiction that Buck-Morss points out about the Enlightenment thinkers’ constant use of slavery as a metaphor?
grounded in universal rights that nevertheless maintained the legality of slavery. o In 1791, the slaves of Saint-Domingue began their revolutionary struggle; it was the final logical consequence of European ideas of universal freedom and equality, and it began with the people living under the most severe oppression by the European bourgeoisie. o 1794: the armed slaves force France to accept that the abolition of slavery has already been accomplished in the colony. o For the next six years, former slaves of Saint-Domingue struggled against British forces. Britain was anxious about the precedent that the slave revolt in Saint-Domingue set for its own Empire, which thrived off of the labor of enslaved Africans in the colonies.

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