ScorpionPaper

ScorpionPaper - 22 June 2005 Scorpions General Overview...

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22 June 2005 Scorpions General Overview Scorpions are a quite diverse and interesting class of arachniada (same as spiders), order scorpiones. (Wee Par. 3). There are currently 1400 species recognized in the world (Gouge Par 3). The scorpions drastically range in size from half in. to 8 in with the world’s largest specimen supposedly in “The Bombay Natural History Society” of a Hetermetrus Swammerdami of over 9.75 in. (Wee Par. 7). Fossils of scorpions have been found from the Paleozoic Strata 430 million years ago. Back then the Silurian scorpions grew to a size of over 1 meter appeared to be aquatic and have gills. But, over millions of the years the scorpion changed very little besides gaining claws (Wee Par. 5). Typically scorpions live in a variety of habitats throughout the world. Scorpions have been found living deserts, grasslands, savannahs, deciduous forests, montane pine forest, intertidal zones, rain forests and caves. Surprisingly scorpions have been located in snow- covered rocks at elevation 12,000 ft in the Himalayas and Andes (Desert Par. 3). Most notably the scorpion has two large pincers on its arm like pedipalps and stinger at the posterior of its abdomen (Pearse 548.) But, the total structure of the scorpion can be broken up into three regions: prosoma, mesosoma, and metasoma. Prosoma
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ScorpionPaper - 22 June 2005 Scorpions General Overview...

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