blackwater - April 2 2007 The Nation 11 ARTICLES BUSH'S...

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April 2, 2007 The Nation. 11 ARTICLES O n September 10, 2001, before most Americans had heard of Al Qaeda or imagined the possibility of a “war on terror,” Donald Rumsfeld stepped to the podium at the Pentagon to deliver one of his first major addresses as Defense Secretary under President George W. Bush. Standing before the for- mer corporate executives he had tapped as his top deputies over seeing the high-stakes business of military contracting—many of them from firms like Enron, Gen- eral Dynamics and Aero space Cor- po ration—Rumsfeld issued a dec- laration of war. “The topic today is an adversary that poses a threat, a serious threat, to the security of the United States of America,” Rumsfeld thundered. “It disrupts the defense of the United States and places the lives of men and women in uniform at risk.” He told his new staff, “You may think I’m describing one of the last de - crepit dictators of the world.… [But] the adversary’s closer to home,” he said. “It’s the Pentagon bureaucra- cy.” Rumsfeld called for a wholesale shift in the running of the Pentagon, supplanting the old DoD bureaucracy with a new model, one based on the private sector. Announcing this major overhaul, Rumsfeld told his audience, “I have no desire to attack the Pentagon; I want to liberate it. We need to save it from itself.” The next morning, the Pentagon would be attacked, literally, as a Boeing 757—American Airlines Flight 77—smashed into its western wall. Rumsfeld would famously assist rescue workers in pulling bodies from the rubble. But it didn’t take long for Rumsfeld to seize the almost unthinkable opportunity presented by 9/11 to put his personal war—laid out just a day before—on the fast track. The new Pentagon policy would emphasize covert actions, sophisticated weapons systems and greater reliance on private contractors. It became known as the Rumsfeld Doctrine. “We must promote a more entrepreneurial approach: one that encourages people to be proactive, not reactive, and to behave less like bureaucrats and more like venture capitalists,” Rumsfeld wrote in the summer of 2002 in an article for Foreign Affairs titled “Transforming the Military.” Although Rumsfeld was later thrown overboard by the Administration in an attempt to placate critics of the Iraq War, his military revolution was here to stay. Bidding farewell to Rumsfeld in November 2006, Bush credited him with overseeing the “most sweeping transformation of America’s global force pos ture since the end of World War II.” Indeed, Rumsfeld’s trade mark “small footprint” approach ushered in one of the most significant developments in modern warfare—the wide- spread use of private contractors in every aspect of war, includ- ing in combat. The often overlooked subplot of the wars of the post-9/11
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This test prep was uploaded on 04/19/2008 for the course COP 3223 taught by Professor Guha during the Spring '08 term at University of Central Florida.

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blackwater - April 2 2007 The Nation 11 ARTICLES BUSH'S...

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