LetscherA_M1_A3 - Russian Culture By Anna Letscher My Culture Having been born in the Ukraine but raised in the USA I have experienced both American and

LetscherA_M1_A3 - Russian Culture By Anna Letscher My...

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Russian CultureBy: Anna Letscher
My CultureHaving been born in the Ukraine, but raised in the USA, I have experienced both American and Russian culture. As a child I was raised with Russian customs, but as an adult I have lived my life based on American customs. However, in the end, I have always identified more with my Russian heritage and culture, than I have with American culture. In the next few slides I will be discussing the major components of my culture, symbols associated with my culture, and evaluating the roles that race, class, age and gender play in the culture.
Major Components Language: In my culture, the language used to communicate is Russian. “The Russian alphabet is derived from the Cyrillic alphabet. The contemporary alphabet consists of 33 letters, some of which were borrowed from Greek and Hebrew” (http://masterrussian.com/russian_alphabet.shtml).Religion: The main religion of Russia is Orthodox Christianity. The second most practiced religion is Islam followed by a small percentage practicing Catholicism, Protestantism, Judaism and Buddhism (http://masterrussian.com/russia/facts.htm).Although other religions are practiced, they are looked down on and discriminated against.
Major Components continuedGovernment: Russia is a considered a Federation. “The head of state is a popularly elected president who is eligible to serve two consecutive terms (and additional nonconsecutive terms); the length of the term was extended from four years to six beginning in 2012 (http://t.html). Health care and education are free to all citizens. The currency is the Russian ruble (RUB). $1 is equivalent to 76.59 RUB.
Traditions“Russian culture is steeped in literature, ballet, painting and classical music” (http://). In Russian, teenagers graduate high school by 16, are usually done with college (or close to done) by 21, and get married at a young age. It is generally looked down upon for a woman to get married later than her 20s. For instance, my mother was married at 18, gave birth to me at 21, by which point my father was finishing up medical school and starting his residency. After marriage, it is traditional for the married couple to live with the husband’s or wife’s family, and rely on the for support. This allows an easier transition when starting a family, but can also create some tension between the newly weds and the in-laws. My parents, for instance, lived with my grandparents until we had been in the United sates for a few years already.
FolkloreSome popular Russian folk tales are about Baba Yaga and a Fire Bird, Snegurochka (Snow Maiden), Father Frost."Baba Yaga is a witch-like old woman who lives in the forest in a house that rests on chicken legs and is surrounded by skulls and bones” (-russian-culture.html).

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