LetscherA_M2_A2 - Japanese Culture By Anna Letscher Argosy...

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Japanese Culture By: Anna Letscher Argosy University
The Japanese culture is a very interesting. Japanese people do not like to embarrass, they work very hard, find harmony important, are very conscious of age and status, address each other by family name and not by given name, and are very respectful. The videos on this culture bring to light many interesting differences between the Japanese and Russian cultures, and will be discussed later in this paper. First will be an analysis of some Japanese behaviors. Let me begin by explaining in more detail, what is meant by: Japanese do not like to embarrass. For Japanese people, saving face is a very big deal. For instance, a Japanese person will not turn down an offer or request outright. If the offer/request cannot be met, then they will simply refer to it as inconvenient, or say that they must think about it (Kwintessential.co.uk). By doing so, they do not refuse and embarrass the other person, but rather let them down easy. The Japanese find personal dignity crucial, and will therefore not insult, criticize or put another person down, or on the spot openly. Face, aka dignity, can be lost, taken away or earned through thanks and praise (Kwintessential.co.uk). The Japanese work hard to not cause loss of dignity, ever. The Japanese are find harmony to be very important in their culture. “Harmony is the guiding philosophy for the Japanese in family and business settings and in society as a whole” (Kwintessential.co.uk). Children are taught how to cooperate and act in a harmonious manner from a very young age. The Japanese people are raised to act and work together as a group, rather than as individuals. Japanese culture is not about individuality. In fact, there is in essence, no individuality in the culture. According to a video by Andy Wee, even in business, all decisions that made are with respect to what is best for the business group as a whole, rather than for each individual. Everything, including business, is about the group as a whole. Business decisions are made with the consideration of the group, not the individuals. Japanese people believe more in universal good rather than personal good. They place a lot of emphasis on working together, being polite, and taking personal responsibility.

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