persuasion vs magic toystory

persuasion vs magic toystory - Student Essay on Comparison...

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Student Essay on Comparison of "Persuasion" and "The Magic Toyshop" Comparison of "Persuasion" and "The Magic Toyshop" by Jane Austen (c)2015 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Contents Student Essay on Comparison of "Persuasion" and "The Magic Toyshop" .................................. 1 Contents ...................................................................................................................................... 2 Essay ........................................................................................................................................... 3 2
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Essay Both The Magic Toyshop by Angela Carter and Persuasion by Jane Austen are constructed as love stories, although not conventional love stories. Austen's novel is part of the cultural movement of Romanticism as, although in earlier novels she satires Romanticism, Persuasion does bear some of the hallmarks of the Romantic period. Carter's novel however, can be seen as an ironic look at the Romantic novel. Therefore both novels provide an interesting viewpoint on their male characters, due not only to their style of writing but also to the novelists' gender and their obvious ideologies. Jane Austen was an early standpoint feminist1 and so it is perhaps surprising to find her writing in the Romantic genre as it was "historically a male phenomenon"2 which not only objectified women but also "subjected them. .. in order to appropiate the feminine for male subjectivity"3. Female Romantic writers such as Austen "critique the dominant gender ideology of their time. .. present(ing) a more complex concept of female experience and capacities"4. In other words Austen's feminist viewpoint allows us to see a more realistic view of the world allowing Austen to provide a less sympathetic view of males and male behaviour then her male counterparts. Carter, however, uses a post- feminist view and so allows an ironical viewpoint on female Romantic writers' feminism, while taking further the critical look at the patriarchal male and the cycle of dominance and subsequent repression of women by males in general within the novel. The main way in which the feminist standpoint is shown within both novels is through the use of free indirect style, a technique of narrating a character's thoughts, decisions and feelings through a combination of first- and third-person narration, producing a double-perspective narration. This allows for the independence of the female protagonist through the first-person narration and also the critical look at not only the female protagonist but also, more importantly, the feminist critique of male characters within the novels through the third-person narration. In both novels the most damning criticisms are levelled at the `father' figure, the archetypal patriarchal male. In Persuasion this is Sir Walter Elliot, Anne's father. He is the first character to whom the reader is introduced, and from the beginning his amorality, irresponsibility, vanity and selfish greed are obvious. One other thing which is made clear is that his daughters were "an awful legacy for a mother to bequeath"5 and that he "has no sense of responsibility for his children"6. Although Sir Walter Elliot holds his daughters, with the exception of Elizabeth, as being of "very inferior value"7, he is
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persuasion vs magic toystory - Student Essay on Comparison...

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