POLICYMAKINGhandout[1]

POLICYMAKINGhandout[1] - POLICYMAKING CHAPTER 17 Types of...

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Unformatted text preview: POLICYMAKING CHAPTER 17 Types of Policies: Distributive policies : Government policies designed to benefit a particular institution or group; all of us pay through taxes to support those who receive the benefit because that benefit works toward the common good. Example: In 2003, Congress allotted over $2 billion in grants for colleges and universities. Can also take the form of social programs. (p.552-54) Redistributional policies: Policies that take government resources (tax funds) from one sector of society and transfer them to another. Example: In Seattle, WA, an initiative was put on a citywide ballot suggesting the addition of a 10-cent tax on every cup of espresso sold in the city. The new revenues created were to fund early childhood programs, so redistributing revenue from espresso drinkers to families with small children. The initiative was voted down. (p.554) Regulation : Government intervention in the workings of a business market to promote some socially desired goal. Example: U.S. used to forbid Mexican semi-trucks from coming more than twenty miles into the country because Mexican trucks are supposedly unsafe and...
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POLICYMAKINGhandout[1] - POLICYMAKING CHAPTER 17 Types of...

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