Leaders Guide - MS 100 Spiritual Life and Community Small...

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MS 100 Spiritual Life and Community Small Group Leader’s Guide 1
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Tips for Leading Your Small Group hat makes a small group successful? There are many factors that contribute to the overall all experience. One of the most important is the role of the leader. During the course of the semester you will be leading your small group in discussing the week’s unit from True Discipleship: A Companion Guide. Here are “seven habits” effective leaders of small group use to generate discussion. These principles will help you to guide the discussion for your group. W Principle #1: Remember Your Role eading a small group is very different from lecturing. A lecture is often a one way conversation. The one who lectures serves in the role of an expert content provider passing along information to those who are listening. A discussion leader, on the other hand, is a peer whose primary function is to moderate the group discussion. As a discussion leader you do not need to have all the answers. L Principle #2: Take Time to Prepare hile it is true that you do not need to have to be an expert on the subject to lead an effective discussion, you do need to prepare. The better your preparation, the more meaningful the group experience is likely to be for the rest of the participants. Before the group meets it will be important for you to familiarize yourself with the content to that week’s unit and leader’s guide. Take time to pray for yourself and the members of your group that the Holy Spirit will use your efforts to further their spiritual growth. W Principle #3: Know Where You are Going dynamic group leader knows where he or she is headed in the discussion. After you have completed the unit for the week and read through the leader’s guide, determine the goals you would like to see accomplished as a result of the discussion. Is there a particular application in the week’s unit that you want to underscore? Should the group make a decision of some kind by the end of the discussion? The best group discussion is a journey. Before setting out, choose a “destination.” A Principle #4: Formulate Your Questions he questions included in the leader’s guide provide a general direction for the small group meeting. However, you should not limit yourself to them. After you have completed the unit and familiarized yourself with the questions in the leader’s guide you should select questions from the unit’s daily lessons and formulate your own additional questions. You will use five basic types of questions during the discussion: T *Launch Questions: These are open ended questions that you will use to draw the group into the discussion. They often introduce the week’s topic by raising a 2
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need. They help the group to “warm up” to the ideas under discussion and to one another. *Observation Questions
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Leaders Guide - MS 100 Spiritual Life and Community Small...

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