Lecture3 - INFO-1003 Introduction to Computer Systems...

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INFO-1003 - Lecture 3 1 Copyright Richard Neville 2007 INFO-1003 Introduction to Computer Systems Lectures 3 & 4 Dr Richard Neville [email protected] Room: 1.6 Lamb Building, Booth street East Week 3
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INFO-1003 - Lecture 3 2 Copyright Richard Neville 2007 Q3 1. Question What is the 11010 2 in radix 10? ANSWER(S): a) 26 10 . 2. Question a) How is the largest 5-bit binary number calculated? – give equation. b) What is the largest 5-bit binary number? c) What is the decimal equivalent of the largest 5-bit binary number? ANSWER(S): a) For any number base x for positive integers of n digits the range is from: 0 to x n – 1, or [0, x n – 1] e.g. x n – 1 = 2 5 – 1 = 32 -1 = 31; a) 11111 2 ; b) 11111 2 = 1×2 4 + 1×2 3 + 1×2 2 + 1×2 1 + 1×2 0 = 1×16 + 1×8 + 1×4 + 1×2 + 1×1 = 31. Question Convert the number 17 (decimal) to an unsigned binary byte? – using sequential division by 2. circle6 ANSWER(S): 2 )117 circle6 2 )17 R = 1 circle6 2 ) 8 R = 0 Result = 10001 binary circle6 2 ) 2 R = 0 circle6 2 ) 1 R = 0 circle6 0 R = 1 NOTE: In the exam approximately 2 question are taken from the topics (and program examples) coved in each lecture
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INFO-1003 - Lecture 3 3 Copyright Richard Neville 2007 Lecture 3: Binary Arithmetic (1) Addition and Subtraction with signed and unsigned integers
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INFO-1003 - Lecture 3 4 Copyright Richard Neville 2007 Learning Outcomes 1 circle6 To be able to perform calculations like: circle6 Binary Addition; circle6 Addition with 2’s complement numbers; circle6 Addition Applied to Signed Integers; circle6 Subtraction;
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INFO-1003 - Lecture 3 5 Copyright Richard Neville 2007 Binary Addition circle6 The following rules apply circle6 0 + 0 = 0 (carry 0) circle6 0 + 1 = 1 (carry 0) circle6 1 + 0 = 1 (carry 0) circle6 1 + 1 = 0 (carry 1) ___ Re. Learning Resources 3.1 & 3.2 , available at the end of the lecture notes.
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INFO-1003 - Lecture 3 6 Copyright Richard Neville 2007 Addition Applied to Unsigned (i.e. Positive) Integers (Example 1) circle6 Using positive (unsigned) integers add the following pair of bytes together circle6 00000101 2 (5 10 ) circle6 00001100 2 (12 10 ) 00000101 + 00001100 00010001 11 barb2left carry Result = 00010001 2 = 17 10
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INFO-1003 - Lecture 3 7 Copyright Richard Neville 2007 Addition Applied to Unsigned (i.e. Positive) Integers (Example 2) circle6 Using positive (unsigned) integers add the following pair of bytes together circle6 11111111 2 (255 10 ) circle6 00000010 2 (2 10 ) circle6 Looking at the first binary integer, we can see that we might meet a problem circle6 As noted in Lecture 2, 255 10 is the largest number we represent in an unsigned byte, we should find problems when we do the addition circle6 Next slide
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INFO-1003 - Lecture 3 8 Copyright Richard Neville 2007 Addition Applied to Positive Integers (Example 2) 11111111 + 00000010 100000001 1111111 barb2left carry This appears to give the correct answer (2 8— 1)+2 1 =255 10 +2 10 =257 10 , but the result is 9 bits, we are adding bytes (8 bits) to produce a byte therefore the leftmost bit must be discarded.
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