Ch. 6 Student Notes-2008

Ch. 6 Student Notes-2008 - Henslin Chapter 6 Outline...

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Henslin Chapter 6 Outline Adapted from: Fowler, L. A. (2008). Instructor’s manual for Henslin: Essentials of sociology a down-to-earth approach (7 th ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon. Henslin, J. M. (2007). Essentials of sociology: A down-to-earth approach (7 th ed.). Boston: Allyn I. What is Deviance? A. Sociologists use the term deviance to refer to any violation of norms to which others respond negatively. 1. Deviance is considered threatening by society because norms make life predictable and bring about social order. 2. Deviance is highly relative; what is deviant in some groups and historical periods is conformist in others. 3. Everyone is deviant at times because everyone violates norms. 4. Humans develop systems of social control ranging from negative sanctions to capital punishment in order to enforce norms. B. Psychologists and sociobiologists explain deviance by looking within individuals for personality disorders and certain genetic predispositions. Sociologists look outside the individual at influences such as socialization and group membership. II. The Symbolic Interactionist Perspective A. Differential association theory suggests that we learn to deviate or to conform mostly through interactions with different groups; if we receive more messages in favor of deviance than conformity, we become deviants. 1. Symbolic interactionists stress that individuals may help to produce their own orientations to life by choosing to associate with certain groups.
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Ch. 6 Student Notes-2008 - Henslin Chapter 6 Outline...

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