Renes Descartes - Explain how any one of the following philosophers exemplifies criticality and creativity CRITICALITY AND CREATIVITY BY RENE DESCARTES

Renes Descartes - Explain how any one of the following...

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Explain how any one of the following philosophers exemplifies criticality and creativityCRITICALITY AND CREATIVITY- BY RENE DESCARTESINTRODUCTIONBackgroundCriticality is the quality, state, or degree of being of the highest importance. Creativity on theother hand is the ability to transcend traditional ideas, rules, patterns, relationships, or the like,and to create meaningful new ideas, forms, methods, and interpretations. René Descartes (1596-1650) had profound effects on modern philosophy, so much so that he is often labelled the‘Father of Modern Philosophy’. This is no more evident than with his ruminations over the mindand the body as he sought to differentiate the two, seeking to prove their separate identity andphilosophy Meditations on First Philosophy.In his attempt to clarify criticality and creativity Rene Descartes used a Latin philosophicalpropositionCogito ergo sum usually translated into English as "I think, therefore I am". Thephrase originally appeared in French as je pense, donc je suisin his Discourse on the Method, soas to reach a wider audience than Latin would have allowed. It appeared in Latin in his laterPrinciples of Philosophy. As Descartes explained, "we cannot doubt of our existence while wedoubt … ." A fuller form, dubito, ergo cogito, ergo sum("I doubt, therefore I think, therefore Iam”), aptly captures Descartes’ intent. This proposition became a fundamental element ofWestern philosophy, as it purported to form a secure foundation for knowledge in the face ofradical doubt. While other knowledge could be a figment of imagination, deception, or mistake,Descartes asserted that the very act of doubting one's own existence served—at minimum—asproof of the reality of one's own mind; there must be a thinking entity—in this case the self—forthere to be a thought.Descartes argued that philosophy must be based on a clear, rational method of inquiry. In order toestablish a firm basis for this method, he subjected popularly-held assumptions concerning the
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nature of the self and the universe to a process of rigorous doubt. Descartes effectively reducedverifiable reality to the thinking self, though he eventually accepted the objective reality of theexternal world and the existence of God. Critics affirm that the most significant result ofDescartes' methodological skepticism was his radical separation of the thinking subject from thephysical world, which he viewed in purely scientific, mechanistic terms, suggesting the modernmetaphor of the world conceived as an intricate machine.In Meditations on First Philosophy, he raised problems of such radical skepticism aboutknowledge of the world, that he set the agenda for epistemology (study of origins of knowledge)for the next 300 years. The only thing we can be certain of, he suggested, is our own existence.
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