HS101_Module 3 Case - Running head OPIUM WARS 1 Opium Wars Trident University HS101 Module 3-Case OPIUM WARS 2 Opium Wars China was known for its

HS101_Module 3 Case - Running head OPIUM WARS 1 Opium Wars...

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Running head: OPIUM WARS 1 Opium Wars Trident University HS101 Module 3-Case
OPIUM WARS Opium Wars China was known for its exclusionary practice. Prior to the 1830’s, the Chinese would allow trade by Western merchants at only one port, and there was only one thing they would accept, silver. The British had become very fond of Chinese tea, and the Chinese government kept strict controls on the trading. The levied unfair fees on the European merchants, and forbid them to learn Chinese. This became a problem for most of the merchants who were spending large amounts of silver to obtain the precious tea. However, the Chinese did not return the favor. There was nothing the British had that interested the Chinese. The Chinese imports of silk, tea and other exotic products began to drain the British of their silver. This infuriated the British merchants who believed that there needed to be a balance between the two countries. However, there was a strong difference of opinion between the two countries. The Chinese viewed trade as a monopoly controlled through its agents known as the cohong system. This had not been an issue in the past since most Europeans had traded under the mercantilist system which was also heavily regulated. However, the Industrial Wars had changed attitudes in the West. The trade imbalance prompted European merchants to try and correct the issue. They began to import opium. This was the one thing the Chinese didn’t

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