American Literature II Syllabus

American Literature - American Literature II Post-Civil War to the Present Instructor Lance Eaton Meets Tuesday/Thursday 8:00AM-9:15AM Lynn Campus

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American Literature II: Post-Civil War to the Present Instructor: Lance Eaton Meets: Tuesday/Thursday, 8:00AM-9:15AM Lynn Campus: Lynn, MBTA LT106 Office Hours: By Appointment [email protected] - 617-824-0472 Description: Students read, interpret, and discuss selected works from the Civil War to contemporary times. Among the authors whose works may be studied are Jewett, Twain, Chopin, Frost, Hughes, Hemingway, O'Neill, Morrison, Updike, and Erdrich. Fulfills open, liberal arts, advanced literature, and humanities electives. Instructional Objectives 1. To demonstrate an ability to read and understand the literature covered on three different levels: one the simplest level, to be able to understand the plot of a literary work; on a deeper level, to be able to understand a work by interpreting its theme(s); and finally, to be able to relate the theme(s) of a work to the world of human experience in general and to your own experiences and values in particular. 2. To familiarize students with important American writers and literary works of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 3. To help students understand how biography, history, culture, and geography have shaped individual authors and works. 4. To help students understand how publishers and readers influence and affect authors’ works. 5. To have students consider and compare the different values, experiences, and perspectives of individual writers, as well as those of various ethnic, religious, and social groups of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. 6. To help students see how specific writers and works defined and influenced modern American literature and culture in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. 7. To introduce students to some of the major and recurring themes, issues, and conflicts in American literature. 8. To help students recognize, describe, and appreciate the aesthetic value of individual literary works. 9. To oster in students a greater awareness and appreciation of the diversity of American literature and culture. 10.To further develop students' critical reading, writing, and thinking skills. 11.To further develop students’ ability to locate, use, and document literary criticism from the World Wide Web and from a modern college library. Goals: 1. Students will develop an understanding of the historical origins of many of United States diverse cultural and intellectual traditions and the relationships and points of exchange among them. 2. Students will gain awareness of how culture shapes literature and other arts.
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3. Students will gain a better appreciation for literature and how better understand narrative subtext. 4. Students will acquire and develop critical thinking and analytical skills.
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2008 for the course LIT 212 taught by Professor Eaton during the Spring '08 term at North Shore Community College.

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American Literature - American Literature II Post-Civil War to the Present Instructor Lance Eaton Meets Tuesday/Thursday 8:00AM-9:15AM Lynn Campus

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