Astronomy 100 HW #10

Astronomy 100 HW #10 - Astronomy 100 HW#10 1 a 2 We know...

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Astronomy 100 HW #10 1) a. 2) We know super massive black holes exist from looking at the emissions of the black holes’ surroundings. The collisions of matter falling into the black holes create energy in the form of intense light that is visible from far away. Another way to identify super massive black holes is that the gravity around the black holes makes all matter including gasses rapidly orbit the black hole, causing a red shift on one side of the hole, and a blue shift on the other side. We can then measure the Doppler shifts and find the speed at which the gas orbit the galactic center, then use Newton’s laws to determine the estimated mass of the object. In the case of the black hole in galaxy M87, the gas orbits the center at about 88 km/ s, meaning its mass is about 2-3 billion times that of the Sun, meaning it must be a super massive black hole. 3) a) This is because the matter collecting around the black holes usually forms an accretion disk which will emit X-rays. Since visible light is not emitted there won’t be a change as far as we know unless we are using a telescope the detect X- rays. b) We should look for X-rays, radio waves and infrared waves. The radio waves
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Astronomy 100 HW #10 - Astronomy 100 HW#10 1 a 2 We know...

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