COMBINATION OF REST OF CH 4 and 5_FALL_2006

COMBINATION OF REST - COMBINATION OF THE REST OF CHAPTERS 4 and 5 CHEMICAL REACTIONS and INTRO TO REACTIONS IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION Additional note the

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COMBINATION OF THE REST OF CHAPTERS 4 and 5: CHEMICAL REACTIONS and INTRO TO REACTIONS IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION Additional note: the nature of aqueous solutions – electrolytes and non-electrolytes molecular materials … ionic materials conductivity HOW DO WE DEAL WITH STOICHIOMETRY? Define: molarity … making solutions … from scratch // by dilution of stock Part I: defining the molarity of a given solution EXAMPLE  If 14.87 g of potassium hydrogen sulfate is dissolved completely in  water to yield a solution with a volume of 250 mL, what is the molar  concentration of the resultant solution? molarity = moles of solute
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        liter of solution EXAMPLE :   Both perchloric acid (HClO 4 ) and magnesium nitrate [Mg(NO 3 ) 2 ] are  strong electrolytes.   (a) What is the concentration of each ion in a solution of perchloric  acid with a concentration of 0.65 M? (b) … in a solution of magnesium nitrate that is 0.382 M?  Part II: Preparing solutions: two options Key point operationally:  per liter of solution [1] Doing it from scratch  -- first, the calculation – How would you prepare a 1.35 L of a 0.0733 M solution of KMnO 4 ?
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Now – how do you actually do it? [2]   Diluting a more concentrated solution  (a ‘stock solution’) EXAMPLE A laboratory in which you work is supplied with stock solutions that  are 6.0 M in sodium hydroxide.  What volume of stock solution would  you need to prepare 775 mL of a solution that is 0.365 M in sodium  hydroxide? Stoichiometric Calculations = Quantitative Statements Reading a balanced equation: 2 C 4 H 10  (g)  +   13 O 2  (g)  ====>  8 CO 2  (g)   +  10 H 2 O (g) 2 molecules … 2 moles … If all are gases at the same temperature and pressure: 2 liters …
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How about grams?  MASS …  CAN’T DO IT! We need MOLES = a conversion factor = the link between the atomic 
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This note was uploaded on 02/27/2008 for the course CHEM 025 taught by Professor X during the Fall '06 term at Lehigh University .

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COMBINATION OF REST - COMBINATION OF THE REST OF CHAPTERS 4 and 5 CHEMICAL REACTIONS and INTRO TO REACTIONS IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION Additional note the

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