Chapter6 - Chapter 6 Ionic Reactions-Nucleophilic...

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Chapter 6 Ionic Reactions-Nucleophilic Substitution and Elimination Reactions of Alkyl Halides
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Chapter 6 2 Introduction The polarity of a carbon-halogen bond leads to the carbon having a partial positive charge In alkyl halides this polarity causes the carbon to become activated to substitution reactions with nucleophiles Carbon-halogen bonds get less polar, longer and weaker in going from fluorine to iodine
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Chapter 6 3 Nucleophilic Substitution Reactions In this reaction a nucleophile is a species with an unshared electron pair which reacts with an electron deficient carbon A leaving group is substituted by a nucleophile Examples of nucleophilic substitution
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Chapter 6 4 Nucleophile The nucleophile reacts at the electron deficient carbon A nucleophile may be any molecule with an unshared electron pair
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Chapter 6 5 Leaving Group A leaving group is a substituent that can leave as a relatively stable entity It can leave as an anion or a neutral species
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Chapter 6 6 Kinetics of a Nucleophilic Substitution Reaction: An S N 2 Reaction The initial rate of the following reaction is measured The rate is directly proportional to the initial concentrations of both methyl chloride and hydroxide The rate equation reflects this dependence S N 2 reaction: substitution, nucleophilic, 2nd order (bimolecular)
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Chapter 6 7 A Mechanism for the S N 2 Reaction A transition state is the high energy state of the reaction It is an unstable entity with a very brief existence (10 -12 s) In the transition state of this reaction bonds are partially formed and broken Both chloromethane and hydroxide are involved in the transition state and this explains why the reaction is second order
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Chapter 6 8 Transition State Theory: Free-Energy Diagrams Exergonic reaction: negative Δ G o (products favored) Endergonic reaction: positive Δ (products not favored) The reaction of chloromethane with hydroxide is highly exergonic The equilibrium constant is very large
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Chapter 6 9 An energy diagram of a typical S N 2 reaction An energy barrier is evident because a bond is being broken in going to the transition state (which is the top of the energy barrier) The difference in energy between starting material and the transition state is the free energy of activation ( Δ G ) The difference in energy between starting molecules and products is the free energy change of the reaction, Δ o
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Chapter 6 10 In a highly endergonic reaction of the same type the energy barrier will be even higher ( Δ G is very large)
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Chapter 6 11 There is a direct relationship between Δ G
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Chapter6 - Chapter 6 Ionic Reactions-Nucleophilic...

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