Lin306_Guide2-FINALVersion

Lin306_Guide2-FINALVersion - LIN 306 Study guide for Test 2...

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LIN 306: Study guide for Test 2 Version: FINAL Generalities The following are things you should know and understand for the November 9 test. You can expect mainly short-answer questions, including multiple choice, fill-in-the-blanks, true-false, and matching. There will be a focus on concepts, terminology, and analysis of data, and in phonetics on symbols and their articulatory descriptions. Your best study tools will be: Read the assigned text, chapters 6, 7, 8, and part of 9 Look over your class notes—you are responsible for what went on in class and some of it is not in the book Look over the assignments that you did—they are a good guide to what to expect on the analytic portions of the test Get with each other : It helps to study with somebody Get with us during our office hours or after class. We can help you and we want you to learn and do well! Phonetics This will be about 1/4 of the test. It is very cut and dried and requires that you know your material. In particular, be sure you know and understand: Phonetics vs. phonology. Know the difference. Speech physiology : You should be able to label the parts of a mid-sagittal section of the human articulatory organs (as in Figure 6.1 on p. 227) Symbols. Know all the phonetic symbols in Table 6.6 on p. 246-247 for English consonants and vowels: If given words written in ordinary English orthography, you should be able to render them plausibly in phonetic symbols; likewise, if given words or phrases written in phonetic symbols, you should be able to write them in ordinary orthography. Consonant Terminology : Know all of the terms relating to consonants given on pp. 227- 236. Table 6.4 on p. 235 will help you but you will notice that it does not include all of the terms. NOTICE that these include the terms you need to describe particular sounds (e.g., “Describe the sound [f]” [Answer: a voiceless labiodental fricative]); or to understand descriptions made in their terms (e.g.: "List two bilabial oral stops" [Answer: [p] and [b]]). Vowel Terminology : Know all of the terms relating to vowels given on pp. 236-240, including tense and lax . Figure 6.5 will be of some help for you. NOTICE that these vowel terms are needed to describe particular vowel sounds (e.g., “Describe the sound [e]” [Answer: a mid tense front unrounded vowel]) , or to understand descriptions made in their terms (e.g.: "List two high tense vowels" [Answer: [i] and [u]].
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This test prep was uploaded on 04/20/2008 for the course LIN 306 taught by Professor Shields during the Fall '08 term at University of Texas.

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Lin306_Guide2-FINALVersion - LIN 306 Study guide for Test 2...

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