Taoism - Taoism: Nature and Relativity of Being Taoism,...

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Taoism: Nature and Relativity of Being Taoism, like Confucianism, was not an organized school, sect, or movement during the Warring States period, but developed into an intellectual (and later religious) tradition that had widespread influence throughout subsequent Chinese history. Early Taoist texts were highly critical of the conformist, morality-focused teachings of Confucius and his followers, and this tendency continued as Taoism served as an alternative to Confucianism for intellectuals as well as an ideology for resistance and rebellion to political authority. Foundations: Laozi, 6 th or 4 th c.? 老子 The Laozi (Lao-tzu, Daode Jing, Tao-te Ching) attributed to Lao Dan or Laozi. Zhuangzi, 399-295 (?) 莊子 The Zhuangzi (Chuang-tzu) Concepts: dao ( ), de ( ), 自然 , 無為
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Laozi: Probably a mythical character. The Laozi became recognized as an important work only after being mentioned by Zhuangzi. The
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2008 for the course ANS 302C taught by Professor Boretz during the Fall '07 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Taoism - Taoism: Nature and Relativity of Being Taoism,...

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