Chemical+Kinetics - Chapter 08 We Know How Far.but How Fast...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 14 pages.

Chapter 08We Know How Far….but How Fast?Preface:Thermodynamics tells us whether something will happen, equilibrium tells us theextent in which it will happen, and kinetics tells us how quickly it will happen. Studyingkinetics is unique unlike other topics in that it requires experimental evidence and data todraw conclusions—we cannot readily look at most reactions and predict their kineticrelationships. A solid understanding of kinetics is important because this will allow us todetermine   reaction   mechanisms   and   thereby,   control   reactions   using   catalysts   orinhibitors. Each mechanism has at least one step with a higher energy barrier than theothers, which can be targeted for catalysts to make the reaction occur more quickly orinhibitors to slow down the reaction. This step is the rate determining or rate limitingstep. Before we start let’s consider an oscillating reaction. The time between each colorchanges can be called a reaction rate. The Briggs-Rauscher Reaction:Section 8.1: The Basics of KineticsSection 8.2: Reaction MechanismsSection 8.3: The Steady-State ApproachSection 8.4: Michaelis-Menten KineticsSection 8.5: Radioactive DecaySection 8.6: Catalysts1
Section 8.1: The Basics of KineticsIn understanding kinetics, we will use a lot of specific terms to describe reactionsand their kinetic behavior. The most important definition is the idea of a rate, whichdefines how the concentration is changing with a change in time. The units of rate areM/s.  Given the following example:2NO2 + F2  2NO2F  (1)In the absence of product, we observe the depletion of the reactants NO2 and F2. Becauseof the stoichiometry, the rate of disappearance of NO2 will be twice as fast as the rate ofdisappearance   of   F2.   When   we   equate   the   expressions,   we   take   into   account   thestoichiometry and the effect on the rate.Rate =   (2)Because the rate depends upon the concentration of the reactants, we generally re-writethe rate as: rate = k[NO2]m[F2]n where m and n are the reaction orders that define how therate depends upon the concentrations. The values are m and n are generally integers (0, 1,or 2) but they can be any value, including negative values, and must be determinedexperimentally if the mechanism is not known. The combined values of m and n definethe overall rate. The rate constant k has units depending upon the overall rate. Let p = overall rate, the units of k are L(p-1)mol-(p-1)s-1.An important distinction to make is the difference between a complex and anelementary reaction that cannot be further broken down into more simple mechanisms –it is already in its most simple form. If we know a reaction is elementary, then thestoichiometry can be used to define the rate. For example, the following reactions areelementary   and   in   each   case,   the   reaction   order   is   equal   to   one   because   of   thestoichiometry.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture