Spoken Language and the Brain

Spoken Language and the Brain - Spoken Language 1 Spoken...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Spoken Language 1 Spoken Language and the Brain Terra Russell Concordia University
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Spoken Language 2 Spoken language is a huge part of our everyday lives. Language is an item that we use to communicate with other people that we come in contact with. However, little is known about spoken languages development and how it works. Another item that leaves people wondering is how the brain can affect spoken language. With serious brain damage done to someone can it affect their spoken language? In the brain it is divided into two halves, the right and the left. In a human the speech area is mainly located in the left hemisphere. The first language area is called Broca’s Area, after Paul Broca. In this area of the brain it has to deal with motor skills of getting the language out. It also seems to be more generally involved in the ability to deal with grammar itself, at least the more complex aspects of grammar. The next area is Wernicke's Area, after Carl Wernicke. Wernicke’s area is responsible for speech comprehension. Reading and writing are a part of language as well, of course. But since these skills have only been around a few thousand years, they are not as clearly marked in terms of brain functioning as the basic comprehension and production areas. But there is an area of the brain called the angular gyrus that lies about halfway between Wernicke's area and the visual cortex of the occipital lobe (Boeree, 2004).
Background image of page 2
Spoken Language 3 (Boeree, 2004) The concept for spoken language in human also has to allow us to reason think, imagine, and express ourselves. It is important to start development of speech when the brain is young. Brain activity of children between the ages of 4 and 12 an enormous amount of brain restructuring takes place. That is why it is important for parents and educators to nurture the brain (Fleming, 2002). They can do this in several ways: -Talk to young children. Because language is symbolic, it requires thinking just to "unlock" meanings of words. -Use audio tapes frequently to replace videos or movies for entertainment. Fast-moving screen images require little thought to process and don't give much time to the cerebral cortex to engage. -Limit the use of television. TV is not very symbolic and
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/20/2008 for the course GOVT 101 taught by Professor Kalmes during the Spring '08 term at Concordia MI.

Page1 / 10

Spoken Language and the Brain - Spoken Language 1 Spoken...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online