Transport Phenomena Lab Report

Transport Phenomena Lab Report - Transport Phenomena Lab...

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Transport Phenomena Lab Report Engineering H191 Autumn 07 Andrew Grunenwald #35 Victoria Dawson #21 Daniel Koehler #38 Ron Taulbee #10 Eric Schnee #20 Professor: Paul Clingan, MTW 1:30 Lab GTA: Michael Vernier, R 1:30 Date of Experiment: October 18, 2007 Date of Submission: October 25, 2007
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1. Introduction The purpose of this experiment was to demonstrate an understanding of fluid flow dynamics and viscosity, to describe a fluid based on observed or derived characteristics from the lab results, to demonstrate an understanding of the power of data acquisition systems, and to demonstrate an analytical perspective on acquired data. In this experiment, the objective was to find the terminal velocity of a falling object within a certain fluid. The fluids used for this experiment were castor oil, corn syrup, and glycerin. The program, LabVIEW, was used in order to track the falling object, a 1/8” diameter steel ball, through the fluid and converted it into to an Excel worksheet. When the data points are plotted on the graph, the slope of the best fit line is the terminal velocity of the falling steel ball. This lab report will explain the lab procedure and methodology, describe the results and analysis of the data taken, discuss the theories and concepts involved with the experiment, and share reflection of the experiment itself and the findings of the experiment. 2. Experiment Methodology Set-up for the experiment as shown in Appendix A, Figure A1. The vertical tube must be vertically level to prevent wall effects on the fall of the ball bearing. A camera is used to record the ball bearing’s motion through the fluid. The camera must be focused on the area containing the ball bearing after its terminal velocity has been reached and before it begins to experience bottom effects. The following instructions for performing the trials can also be found on the lab section of the FEH website at http://feh.osu.edu/Labs/Transport/Transport_LabInstructions.pdf Viscosity Lab Procedure
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This lab uses a LabVIEW program called ViscosityLab that is available from the FEH Labs website: http://feh.osu.edu/Labs/labs.html. Download the program then open the ViscosityLab.llb application and follow these instructions: Initial Analysis 1. Start ViscosityLab VI 2. Choose VGA USB Camera from the list and click OK 3. Choose “Adjust Video” and set the camera to a resolution of 640x480 4. Focus the camera, set the tube, and align the calibration grid 5. Move the ball to the top of the tube with the magnet. 6. Align the tube to be vertical and wait for bubbles to leave the camera viewing area. 7. Release the ball. You may choose to hold the tube vertical throughout the data collection, but do not move it while recording frames. *IMPORTANT*
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2008 for the course H 191 taught by Professor Clingan during the Fall '08 term at Ohio State.

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Transport Phenomena Lab Report - Transport Phenomena Lab...

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