hockey fighting

hockey fighting - Derek Kirby 11-13-07 ENGL 401 Sec. 28...

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Derek Kirby 11-13-07 ENGL 401 Sec. 28 Jablonski Is Fighting in Hockey Acceptable? As two hockey players are swiftly gliding down the ice, using force to snatch the puck from their opponent, tempers may rise. The two players look to take out their anger in some way. They choose each other. And the manner they take out in is fighting. Fighting in hockey has always been a controversy since the sport was first established. Many see fighting as away to pump the team up, and build self esteem. Fans love it, and the players love it when fans are entertained. Others see it as a barbaric action that is a bad model for children. Parents are worried their children will be given the wrong ideas. A median for the two can be met if a harsher penalty was forced on the fighting players. The sides for the three arguments are each strong in their own way and each have a good argument to support them. Many hockey fans love when players get into fights. They believe it can lift spirits of a team, when the team is down. A fight gets the fans all riled up. The noise of the crowd cheering inspires the players. This builds momentum. The players get a rush of adrenaline from all the action. That rush pushes them harder
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and can lead to a comeback when they’re team is down in points. The great hockey legend, Johnny Bucyk, feels that a hockey fight always boosts the home team, because they hear the fans cheering for them, the momentum is up, and the players, for some reason, play harder (Bucyk). A fight can be a great way to entertain fans, also. This puts more people in the seats. More fans will attend games, and more money will be made. There will not be another strike, like there was in the 2004- 2005 season, because when more fans are in the seats, more money is made. Although a lot of players in the NHL are quite skillful, and play with grace, as well as agility, some players are on teams purely for power (Reilly). Some of the best known hockey fighters in NHL history are P.J. Stock, who once played for the Boston Bruins, Tie Domi, and Bob Probert. When a team needs to start using more force to get the puck, they want a player or players who will use such force to obtain the puck. Now when hockey is being played, it comes hand in hand with emotion. Players get angry that maybe they are losing, or are not playing so well. They boil over and may go over the top. They take out their anger on an opposing player using violence. Players know when to control themselves, and when to let go. Such player, however, like Stock, Domi, and Probert, are more likely to
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fight than to play with grace and skill. Some see this as great entertainment, but their actions cannot be used as a judgment for the whole organization. (Tajen) Two family members of mine, Christopher Kirby (brother) and Stephen Kirby (Uncle), have played hockey basically their entire lives, and have great insight on the topic. As my brother Christopher puts it: “I Love hockey, and have played it for my entire life. I was even the captain of my
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2008 for the course ENGL 401 taught by Professor Jablonski during the Fall '07 term at New Hampshire.

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hockey fighting - Derek Kirby 11-13-07 ENGL 401 Sec. 28...

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