3 - renaissance sacred music

3 - renaissance sacred music - Renaissance (1450-1600) Age...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Renaissance (1450-1600) Age of Humanism (secular influence) Printing, Reformation Rhetoric, Comprehension of the Word Exploration Musicians in Renaissance Society Churches, cities, and courts Trades of instrument building, printing, and music publishing Venice (Petrucci), Paris (Attaignant) Merchant class music patrons Renaissance Musical Style A cappella singing Polyphony based on Continuous imitation, cantus firmus Fuller-sounding harmonies Solo instrumental works Professional singers in church setting Sacred Genre of the Renaissance (1450-1600) MOTET Ave Maria ... Virgo serena Josquin Deprez Pope Marcellus Mass (Gloria) Giovanni Palestrina by MASS by RENAISSANCE MASS concentration on the Ordinary texts do not change Kyrie, Gloria, Credo, Sanctus, Agnus Dei Secular Influences began to build up using non-religious songs as a cantus firmus (a preexistent tune -- like chant in a motet or organum) Du Fay and the Cantus Firmus Mass Guillaume Du Fay (c. 13971474) Burgundian composer Burgundian School Less complex music than Ars nova Use of cantus firmus (chant or popular song) L'homme arme The man, the man, the armed man, The armed man The armed man should be feared, should be feared. Everywhere it has been proclaimed That each man shall arm himself With a coat of iron mail. Constantinople falls to the Turks - 1453 Du Fay: L'homme arm Mass, Kyrie Popular secular tune is the cantus firmus (found in the tenor voice) First part of the Mass Ordinary Non-imitative polyphonic texture (four voices) Ternary form The Motet in the Renaissance Single Latin text Marian motets (Virgin Mary) Written for 3, 4, or more voices Cantus firmus Josquin des Prez and the Motet Josquin (c. 14501521) Franco-Flemish Italian career Josquin des Prez Patrons Milan, Cardinal Ascanio Sforza Ferrara, Ercole d'Este Rome, papal choir Humanistic writing Sacred and secular music Josquin: Ave Maria . . . virgo serena (Listening Guide) Renaissance motet Combinations of voices and textures Quotation of chant Rest of work is newly composed Josquin Ave Maria Imitative vs. homorhythmic sections Final couplet: simple texture, example of humanistic spirit to bring out the text-- as a type of musical rhetoric at the personal prayer-- "Remember ME" The Late Renaissance Mass Martin Luther (14831546): Reformation Counter-Reformation (1530s1590s) Council of Trent Corruption of chant by embellishment Use of certain instruments in religious services Incorporation of popular music in Masses Secularism of music Irreverent attitude of church musicians Pure vocal style that respected the integrity of the sacred texts Palestrina and the Pope Marcellus Mass Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (c. 15251594) Italian composer, organist, and choirmaster Sistine Chapel Choir (Pope Julius III) Wrote mostly sacred music Palestrina: Pope Marcellus Mass, Gloria (Listening Guide) Satisfies the new strict demands of the Council of Trent Probably performed a cappella Written for six voice parts Soprano (sung by boys or male falsettists) Alto (sung by male altos or countertenors (tenors with high voices) Tenor I Tenor II Bass I Bass II Opens with a monophonic intonation Choral sections are polyphonic Text is clear and audible The Late Renaissance Mass Martin Luther (14831546): Reformation Counter-Reformation (1530s1590s) Council of Trent Corruption of chant by embellishment Use of certain instruments in religious services Incorporation of popular music in Masses Secularism of music Irreverent attitude of church musicians Pure vocal style that respected the integrity of the sacred texts Palestrina and the Pope Marcellus Mass Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (c. 15251594) Called Palestrina Italian composer, organist, and choirmaster Sistine Chapel Choir (Pope Julius III) Wrote mostly sacred music Palestrina: Pope Marcellus Mass, Gloria (Listening Guide) Satisfies the new strict demands of the Council of Trent Probably performed a cappella Written for six voice parts Soprano (sung by boys or male falsettists) Alto (sung by male altos or countertenors (tenors with high voices) Tenor I Tenor II Bass I Bass II Opens with a monophonic intonation Choral sections are polyphonic Text is clear and audible ...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/27/2008 for the course EMUS 3822 taught by Professor Hagen during the Spring '07 term at Colorado.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online