n_0522 - morning KwikLube had 4 cars in before noon. What...

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Chapter 5 Section 5.1 1 Chapter 5 More Probability Theory and Probability Distributions
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Chapter 5 Section 5.1 2
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Chapter 5 Section 5.1 3 Venn diagram
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Chapter 5 Section 5.1 4
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Chapter 5 Section 5.1 5 Example: Let S be the event that Joe gets an A in statistics. Let F be the event that Joe gets an A in French. Suppose P( S ) = .25 and P( F ) = .45. Are S and F independent? P( S and F ) Are S and F disjoint (mutually exclusive)? P( S or F )
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Chapter 5 Section 5.1 6 Applying the multiplication rule If two events A and B are independent, the event that A does not occur is also independent of B. 75% of all voters in a city are Republicans. If two voters are chosen independently, the probability that the first one is a Republican and the second one is not a republican? The multiplication rule also extends to collections of more than two events, provided that all are independent.
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Chapter 5 Section 5.1 7 Example The probability that a car is late at KwikLube is 0.0918. Suppose on Monday
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Unformatted text preview: morning KwikLube had 4 cars in before noon. What is the probability that all these 4 cars are late? Chapter 5 Section 5.1 8 Chapter 5 Section 5.1 9 Example 5.5 • P(D)=0.7 P(M)=0.5, P(D and M) = 0.3 • what is P(D or M)? Chapter 5 Section 5.4 10 Conditional Probability • The distribution of a variable given that a condition is satisfied. • P( A | B ) is read as: – the probability of A given B – the probability of A conditioned on B • Events A and B play different roles in the conditional probability P( A | B ). B represents the information we are given, and A is the event whose probability we are computing. Chapter 5 Section 5.4 11 General Multiplication Rule: • The probability that both of two events A and B happen together can be found by P( A and B ) = P( A )P (B|A ) • If A and B are independent, P (B|A ) =P(B) Chapter 5 Section 5.4 12...
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This note was uploaded on 02/27/2008 for the course BCOR 1020 taught by Professor Liang,fang during the Summer '07 term at Colorado.

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n_0522 - morning KwikLube had 4 cars in before noon. What...

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