Title IX Rough Draft almost final

Title IX Rough Draft almost final - Barron 1 Meaghan Barron...

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Barron 1 Meaghan Barron ENG 103 Dr. Adams 24 March 2008 Is Title IX Such a Good Thing? “Do you remember when ‘girl sports’ was an oxymoron? Do you remember when being involved in high school athletics for girls meant acting as timekeeper at the boys’ swimming meet? Or being a cheerleader?” (“Open to All” 7) As hard as it is to believe, as recently as 35 years ago there were not any laws that mandated that no one should be excluded from participation in athletic programs receiving federal assistance on the basis of sex. In 1972 a federal law, referred to as Title IX, was passed to end this discrimination and unjustness. For over a few decades people have debated the impact of the law on men’s and women’s sports. Although many people agree with and completely support the law, others believe that it has taken away from men’s sports, but I believe that the law does have some faults but is too important to women. Women were once denied many rights, including the rights to vote, own property, and enter certain professions, but the right to play sports was not something that was denied to women; it was just viewed as unacceptable for them because of their physical limitations and as improper for them because of their social roles. According to the Secretary of Education’s Commission on Opportunity in Athletics Report, “Prior to the enactment of Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 (Title IX), many American colleges and universities engaged in discrimination against female students” (“Open to All” 8). This discrimination came in many forms; women were discouraged from pursuing math and science degrees, were denied admission to undergraduate and graduate schools, were barred from participating in intercollegiate athletics, and were denied scholarships.
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Barron 2 By the 1960s, Congress began to examine the discriminatory policies and practices used by colleges and universities against women. Richard Worsnop reports that it was, “pressure from the civil rights and women’s movements [that] finally resulted in congressional approval of Title IX” (Worsnop). According to the Secretary of Education’s Commission on Opportunity in Athletics Report, “Members of the House and Senate introduced five competing bills to end discrimination…after approval by the House and Senate, President Richard Nixon signed the Title IX bill into law in June 23, 1972” (“Open to All” 8). The law states, “No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance” (The Living Law 1). It was this law that stirred many debates over whether it was fair or not to both women and men. Many people strongly oppose Title IX because they claim that it takes away from men’s
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Title IX Rough Draft almost final - Barron 1 Meaghan Barron...

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