Muller-Lyer Illusion Experiment1

Muller-Lyer Illusion Experiment1 - Muller-Lyer Illusion...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Muller-Lyer Illusion What methods did we employ in this experiment? On each trial, two vertical lines were shown. One line had the outward-drawn wings to make the Muller-Lyer stimulus, and was always the same size. The other (comparison) line had no wings and its length varied from trial to trial. Your task was to choose which vertical line was longer on a given trial. The independent variable in this experiment was the length of the comparison line. The dependent variable was the proportion of trials in which you reported that the Muller-Lyer line was longer than the comparison line. What do we predict participants will do? Why? The graph, below, plots the proportion of trials in which the Muller-Lyer line was reported as longer than the comparison line. The Muller-Lyer line was always 100 pixels long. The x-axis gives the pixel length of the comparison line. The Muller-Lyer illusion is that the line with wings appears to be longer than a line without wings. Typical data shows that proportions are close to
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/20/2008 for the course PSY 214 taught by Professor Bireta during the Spring '08 term at TCNJ.

Page1 / 4

Muller-Lyer Illusion Experiment1 - Muller-Lyer Illusion...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online