Blind Spot Experiment 2

Blind Spot Experiment 2 - Blind Spot Minimum time to...

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Unformatted text preview: Blind Spot Minimum time to complete this experiment: 35 minutes Your eyes contain a dense set of receptors that are sensitive to light energy. These receptors convert light energy into electrical energy, which eventually is transferred to your nervous system and your brain. These receptors, however, are not distributed evenly across your eye. There is a central location, called the fovea, where the receptors are very densely packed. Generally, when you stare at an object you are arranging your eyes so that the object's image falls on the foveae of your eyes. There are fewer receptors outside the fovea. In fact, in some places there are no receptors at all. There is a place in each eye where the optic nerve exits the back of the eye to send information to the brain. This "hole" is called the optic disk. It contains no light sensitive receptors. As a result, any light that falls on this part of the eye is undetected and invisible to you. Functionally, this location on the eye is called the blind spot. You have probably never noticed your blind spots (one in each eye). There are several reasons for this. First, each blind spot is far away from its eye's fovea. Because the fovea is typically where you are "looking," you would not generally notice that something has...
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Blind Spot Experiment 2 - Blind Spot Minimum time to...

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