LOXPHOSprintForReal

LOXPHOSprintForReal - Loss of Oxidative Phosphorylation...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Heart attacks result in the loss of oxygen to the blood and are no laughing matter. Loss of Oxidative Phosphorylation
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This module discusses what can go wrong in the process of oxidative phosphorylation. The end result of oxidative phosphorylation is the development of ATP for which there are three major chemical pathways for the production of ATP. Figure 1. Notice that for 1 mole of glucose you get the greatest number of ATP molecules from the electron transport system. These three systems, glycolysis, Krebs and electron transport system are intimately linked together but they can be selectively altered by various chemicals. Metabolic demanding systems such as neural, cardiac, intestinal, and kidney tissue require the cascade of glycolysis, Krebs cycle and the electron transport system (ETC) to be linked. Any break in the linkage of these systems will spell disaster for the cells. Even though the ETS produces the most ATP, it cannot produce ATP is there is an alteration to the Krebs cycle. In a similar way, if there is a problem with glycolysis, the Krebs cycle will not function as well. Thus these systems have to be considered as a domino system. If one of the systems is affected, all of them are affected. The only exceptions to this role are the skeletal muscle cells. They can stop at the glycolytic step and not be damaged as rapidly as neural, cardia, renal and intestinal cells. Loss of Oxidative Phosphorylation
Background image of page 2
ATP: This molecule promotes all chemical reactions. Figure 2 demonstrates ATP and its precursor ADP. Site 1: Problems with blood supply-Carbon Monoxide poisoning Recall that for all cells to function, they need to have a close proximity to the blood so that oxygen can be delivered to the cells and carbon dioxide removed. In addition, the blood carries the chemical breakdown of food, (glucose, amino acids, and fatty acids) which also must be transported into the cell. What happens when there is a loss of oxygen supply? For this discussion, carbon monoxide will be used as an example of an inhibitor of oxygen transport. Keep in mind, that other situations such as a severe blood loss (e.g. hemorrhage) will have similar effects. That discussion will be held later in the course. Carbon monoxide poisoning is due to the blocking of oxygen transfer to the cells. Carbon monoxide has a significant affinity to the iron (or copper) sites in hemoglobin, the principal oxygen-carrying compound in blood. The affinity between carbon monoxide and hemoglobin is 240 times stronger than the affinity between hemoglobin and oxygen. Once carbon monoxide is inhaled, it binds to the hemoglobin and also causes any oxygen that is attached to the hemoglobin molecule to hold onto the oxygen! The end result of carbon monoxide poisoning at a metabolic level is as
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/21/2008 for the course BIOL 100 taught by Professor Lee during the Winter '07 term at San Diego State.

Page1 / 11

LOXPHOSprintForReal - Loss of Oxidative Phosphorylation...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online