OxphosPrint - Oxidative Phosphorylation Oxidative...

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Oxidative phosphorylation allows us to move our bodies in many different ways. Oxidative Phosphorylation
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As I type this message, my fingers hit the keyboard keys clearly and accurately while I listen to the latest Bob Dylan record. My eyes focus on the monitor and my heart beats a steady 60 bts/minute while my chest rises and falls in a slow steady rhythm. Life is good. Thanks to the mitochondria , the organelle that is found in all my cells that produces the ATP by the process of oxidative phosphorylation I can appreciate Dylan's music and my muscles throughout my body respond to the motor commands of my brain. The mitochondrion is king! It is the organelle that produces the greatest amount of ATP and more than likely originated as its own bacteria and over millions of years formed a symbiotic relationship with other cells to make the current eukaryote. The mitochondria determine the life or death of cells since it produces so much ATP which powers all of our chemical reactions. Let's take a look at the structure of the mitochondria: Every cell has many mitochondria. Each mitochondrion has two membranes --an outer membrane and an inner membrane. The inner membrane has inward folds, called cristae. The space inside the inner membrane is called the matrix. The matrix contains enzymes for aerobic respiration. The space between the inner membrane and the outer membrane is called the
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intermembrane space. Compare the diagram to the microscopic photograph of a mitochondrion. Try to identify these structures listed in the diagram on the microscopic view of a mitochondrion. What about Fats and Proteins? When we eat food, it is not pure glucose. We also ingest, mechanically breakup and eventually send to our cells, proteins and lipids. Where do these important molecules enter into the various metabolic chains, glycolysis, Krebs Cycle and oxidative phosphorylation to produce energy? Notice in Figure 2, how proteins and lipids also enter into the glycolytic, Krebs Cycle to produce energy. Protein and lipids can be converted into a number of different molecules that enter into the glycolytic or Krebs Cycle. They do not enter into the electron transport or oxidative phosphorylation pathway. Of the molecules that are a pivotal towards taking the energy from food and converting it into ATP, Acetyl-CoA is most important. Acetyl- CoA is the transition molecule from pyruvate to the Krebs Cycle. Proteins and Fats are metabolized into Acetyl CoA which is metabolized in the Krebs
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OxphosPrint - Oxidative Phosphorylation Oxidative...

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