ProteinMetabolismPrint

ProteinMetabolismPrint - Protein Metabolism When we take a...

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When we take a bite to eat of any food source, we are completely unaware of what is taking place with that morsel of a meal once we swallow it. For proteins, the journey to assimilation begins in the stomach. After ingestion of a protein food, it is broken down mechanically by the peristaltic motion of the gastrointestinal tract and chemically by the release of enzymes and hormones that take part in digestion. The process of digestion reduces the macromolecules into particles and molecules small enough to cross the lining of the gut and reach the internal environment. The digested nutrients are passed from the gut lumen into the blood or lymph, which distributes them through the body. In the stomach, proteins are broken down by pepsin and hydrochloric acid to peptones and peptides, small chains of amino acids, which pass to the small intestines (Figure 1). When peptides reach the small intestines they are broken down further into amino acid monomers by the pancreatic enzyme trypsin. Other pancreatic enzymes involved in
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This note was uploaded on 04/21/2008 for the course BIOL 100 taught by Professor Lee during the Winter '07 term at San Diego State.

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ProteinMetabolismPrint - Protein Metabolism When we take a...

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