The Effects of Alternative Training Regimens on Domestic Pigeons Implemented During Transitive Infer

The Effects of Alternative Training Regimens on Domestic Pigeons Implemented During Transitive Infer

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Effects of Alternative Training 1 The Effects of Alternative Training Regimens on Domestic Pigeons Implemented During Transitive Inference Training Stephanie Abrams December 6, 2007
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Effects of Alternative Training 2 The Effects of Alternative Training Regimens on Domestic Pigeons Implemented During Transitive Inference Training According to the work of Piaget (1928), transitive inference is the ability to logically reason or learn through relations. Transitive inference tasks require the subject to logically rank individual stimuli that is presented in pairs. Each stimuli has a respective value derived from the linear hierarchically format of the group. For instance, the rank order of stimuli A-F can be written as A > B > C > D > E > F, where A is always reinforced, while F never is. Furthermore, stimuli can be either be S+ or S-, with the exception of the first and last stimuli, depending on what it is paired with. S+ denotes the stronger stimulus in a pair, while S- denotes the weaker stimulus, causing the selection of the S+ to always be correct and the selection of S- to always be incorrect. Therefore, in the pairing of B+ C-, a choice of B+ is correct and earns the subject reinforcement. Conversely, in the pairing of C+ D-, C+ is the correct choice. In addition, subjects are provided with relational information for only some pairs of stimuli. For instance, information is provided for the relationship between A and B, as well as B and C, but the subject is never given relational information pertaining to A and C as a pair. However, sufficient information is provided allowing a competent subject to make logical inferences regarding the hierarchy of each stimulus. This stimulus hierarchy is equivalent to assigning each stimulus a rank order, thus allowing the subject to make inferences on pairs of stimuli that were never previously paired together. A probe test is issued once sufficient training has occurred to examine the subject's preference of two unpaired stimuli. This test is a choice test in which two equally presented and reinforced stimuli that have not previously been paired together are presented without the possibility of reinforcement. Stimulus B and D are generally selected, as
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Effects of Alternative Training 3 both stimuli have been equally presented and reinforced during training; therefore, there is a reduced chance for subject bias or selection based on reinforcement. B is a more valuable stimulus than D, thus making it the correct choice in a B+ D- probe test. This hierarchy is evident when evaluating each stimulus's pairing with stimulus C. In the pairing of B+ C-, B is always reinforced; however in the pairing of C+ D-, D is never reinforced. A subject's correct choice on the probe test suggests the ability to use transitive inference. Prior to the study by Fersen, Wynne, Delius, & Straddon (1991) it was believed that only
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This essay was uploaded on 04/20/2008 for the course PSYCH 2211 taught by Professor Mcdevitt during the Spring '08 term at McDaniel.

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The Effects of Alternative Training Regimens on Domestic Pigeons Implemented During Transitive Infer

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