Final Exam Book notes - Final Exam Info The final exam for...

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Final Exam InfoThe final exam for this course will consist of two sections and will be between 50-75 multiple choice questions. Section 1 will cover material from the last two chapters (Ch 17 and 18) and thelecture material accompanying them. Section 2 will be cumulative, including questions over any material we have covered in the course this semester. The textbook information for Section 1 will come from the following pages. As always, anythingin the chapter that is NOT in these pages and was NOT covered in lecture will NOT be on the exam. You are safe to skip those sections when studying. Ch 17: Effects of Rape and Sexual Assault pg. 455 – 458 Rape Trauma SyndromeCoined by Burgess and Holmstrom(1979)A two-stage stress response pattern that occurs after a rape characterized by physical, psychological, behavioral, sexual problems, or a combination of these. DSM does not recognize RTS, symptoms are similar to PTS, which occurs after a traumatic event. (Research has found that a significant number of rape victims develop PTSD within 2 weeks after the rape) Steps/phasesAcute phase-first stage of the rape trauma syndrome, in which a victim feels shock, fear, anger, or other related feelings. Victims feel afraid to be alone, fear strangers, or fear being in the area where the rape happened(such as their house or car)They may also feel anger at their assailant, health care workers, family,and their self.A victim may also experience wide mood fluctuations. Difficulties sleeping, including recurrent nightmares, are common. This phase begins immediately after the assault & may last from days to weeks and involve several stress symptoms. Most of the time a victim will talk to friends or family rather than the police. Younger victims are more likely to tell someone than are older victims, perhaps because older victims blame themselves more for the rape and may fear that others will blame them.Overall, women who speak out about their rape experiences and experience negative reactions often stop talking about it. Negative reactions lead to increased self-blame and uncertainty about whether the experience qualified as rap, and they increase the likelihood of PTSDWomen who report being raped by strangers: experience more anxiety, fear and startle responses.

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