arthessay - The human figure occupies a central place in...

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The human figure occupies a central place in Greek art and particularly in Greek sculpture. The gods are thus almost always represented in human form. The human body is a constantly recurring motif in Greek art. Soaring temple columns with their finely-chiselled lines recall the slender bodies of Greek youths, and the name for the capital of a column (kionokranon) means head. In paintings and sculptured reliefs the beauty of the human form in repose or in action stands out against a neutral background. Only later, during the Hellenistic period, do we find some rather clumsy attempts to represent man in a natural setting. The Greek sculptors succeeded in rendering this “ideal” beauty through the science of proportions, which, until the beginning of the Middle Ages, was considered to be the key to beauty. The “Doryphorus”, or the spearbearer, sculpted by Polyclitus was known as the “Canon” of beauty because it embodied the ideal proportions of the male form. The concept of beauty in Classical Greek art was the idea of expressing the
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arthessay - The human figure occupies a central place in...

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