Depression - Depression 1 Depression Danielle Wright Dalton...

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Depression 1 Depression Danielle Wright Dalton State College
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Depression 2 Depression A person who is depressed does not feel blue or sad for a few days and it pass them by; they have these feelings to the point of interfering with their daily life and routine. Depression causes pain for the person who has it and for their loved ones ( Depression, 2007 ) . It is not bias to age, race, or gender in the sense that anyone can develop the disease, but some individuals are more susceptible than others. This disease is the fourth leading cause of disability in the United States, and is seen as becoming the second leading cause by the year 2020 (Varcarolis, Carson, & Shoemaker, 2006, p.327). While that statistic is alarming, it is not surprising when considering research has stated that seventy-five percent of people, ages 13-54, have met the criteria for depression and have had at least one episode in their life (Bernstein, 2006, p.333). Depression is a common problem that can present in different ways in different people. It is most simply defined as an extreme feeling of sadness, despair, dejection, lack of worth, or emptiness (Berman, Snyder, Kozier, & Erb, 2008, p.1066). This broad definition can be narrowed when we look at the different components of the whole self. Emotional symptoms may include sadness, anxiousness, emptiness, hopelessness, guilt, worthlessness, helplessness, or numbness. Some behavioral sings include irritability, difficulty concentrating or remember details, difficulty making decisions, loss of interest in activities or hobbies that were once enjoyable, sleep disturbances, and social withdrawal. Physical signs of depression may include loss of appetite, weight loss, constipation, ongoing aches and pains, headaches, digestive problems, and dizziness. Not everyone diagnosed with depression will have every symptom because they may be different according to age, gender, or race ( Depression, 2007). A diagnosis of depression can occur when certain feature of present, the most essential being a period of two or more consecutive weeks of depressed mood or the loss of interest or pleasure
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Depression 3 in nearly all activities. The individual must also experience four or more of the symptoms from the list of emotion, behavioral and physical symptoms mentions above. We live in a society where depression is seen as a weakness or an excuse, so diagnosing may become more difficult. A person’s facial expressions, demeanor, somatic complaints, irritability level, anger level, and frustration level can infer the presence of a depressed mood (Bernstein, 2006, p.336). Depressive syndrome often is accompanied by other psychiatric disorders. Mixed anxiety- depression is the most common psychiatric presentation (Varcarolis , 2006, p.327), occurring in 58% of depressed persons. A person diagnosed with an anxiety disorder has a greater risk of developing depression, making treatment that much more necessary since it may prevent the onset of depression. This special care should be taken specifically with those person who have a
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2008 for the course NURS 1106 taught by Professor Roe during the Spring '08 term at Dalton State.

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Depression - Depression 1 Depression Danielle Wright Dalton...

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