eng 1010 classical argument

eng 1010 classical argument - Haag1 Dustin Haag Christina...

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Haag1 Dustin Haag Christina Ingoglia Eng 1010-32 2 December 2007 Job Outsourcing Job outsourcing can be described as the exporting of jobs, typically to developing countries where well-trained workers are willing to work for lower wages and fewer, if any, benefits. This practice is becoming more and more appealing to, and common among, large corporations and companies in post-industrial countries. The United States is one of the World’s leaders in job outsourcing, and although this process can be beneficial to companies, it is becoming problematic for the U.S.’s current economic recovery. One of the worst offenders of offshoring in the U.S. is the information technology (IT) sector. These high paid, highly educated job positions are ideal for exporting to countries such as India and China, where low-wage, highly educated, English speaking populations are available to replace American workers. (Cooper, “Exporting Jobs”, pg1) Without government tracking and regulation the outsourcing epidemic of IT, and jobs in other sectors, will continue to spread, taking not only
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Haag 2 American jobs, but also the availability of middle-class status to the average American worker. In order to slow this trend, the government needs to begin tracking outsourced jobs, and find a way to regulate them. As it stands right now, there are no restrictions or ways to track the number of jobs, or the nature of jobs, that companies ship offshore. This means that a company can move its entire production to an offshore location, eliminating hundreds, if not thousands of American jobs, without any reparations for doing so. If this practice continues, the only viable outcome will be the elimination of nearly all factory and manufacturing jobs in the United States. Employment will move almost solely to the service sector, where workers face much lower salaries, fewer benefits, and poorer working conditions. More than 2.8 million factory jobs have been lost since 2000, according to the Labor Department. (Cooper, “Exporting Jobs” p1) The majority of these jobs were in the computer, electronic and textiles industries, and up to ten percent of these lost middle-class jobs can be attributed to job outsourcing. Eventually, outsourcing will effectively shut many workers out of the middle class by decreasing the availability of middle class jobs to Americans, and by doing so, take away their ability to make social class shifts.
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Haag 3 The loss of these IT jobs create a great hardship and an injustice for the workers and the families of outsourced jobs, and marks a permanent shift of economic ideals and patterns in the U.S. Even those in favor of free-trade and thus job outsourcing admit, as Harris Miller, President of the Information Technology Associations of America, has, I do not mean to downplay the very real impacts of offshore competition to American IT workers or their families. Thousands of IT professionals have played by the rules: studied hard in school, worked long hours, made a sweat equity investment
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2008 for the course ENGL 1010 taught by Professor Ingolia during the Fall '08 term at Wyoming.

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eng 1010 classical argument - Haag1 Dustin Haag Christina...

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