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Microeconomics
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Chapter 19 / Exercise 9
Microeconomics
Arnold
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LESSON TITLE: 7.02 Peace or Power I. Page 2 Title: The Spark a. Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas i.Summary of the Case: Linda Brown who was seven, had to walk a half-mile through a railroad switchyard to catch a bus that would take her to the school. However there was a school 7 blocks from her home, but it was an all white school. It's because of this that her father and NAACP along with other parents challenged the laws that segregated schools. Said that separate facilities were inherently unequal and a violation of the 14 th amendment. ii.Outcome of the Case: iii.Define segregation: Enforced separation of groups. iv.Plessy v. Ferguson Background: Separate facilities were acceptable as long as they were equal. v.Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP: Argued that segregated schools were unequal, denying the rights by the 14 th amendment, had an effect on the development of African American children. vi.Define Integration: Acceptance and equal access for all people into a group or place b. NAACP and “The man who killed Jim Crow”: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (1909). Charles Houston...known as “The Man Who Killed Jim Crow” because he helped lead many civil rights cases up till his death in 1950 and mentored Thurgood Marshall. NAACP focused on unjust laws that infringed rights through court system. Constance Baker Motley only female NAACP lawyer. Roy Wilkins national leader of NAACP for 20+ years. c. Montgomery, Alabama Bus Boycot i.Rosa Parks: Took a Montgomery bus to get home, she was african american and took her seat toward the back as required by law. When the driver told her to stand to make room for more white passengers, Parks had enough and refused to give up her seat leading to her arrest. ii.Boycot: Refusal to deal with something, such as a business, as a protest to force some kind of change. Done to the city's buses. MLK Jr. showed support for this protest. African Americans who participated walked, shared rides, or took taxis
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Microeconomics
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Chapter 19 / Exercise 9
Microeconomics
Arnold
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to work. iii.Impact and Result: Since three quarters of bus riders were African American this had a big impact. Whites responded with violence and lawsuits. MLK urged it to continue until the city changed it's policy, encouraging nonviolence even after his own home was bombed. After a year the Supreme Court threw out the Montgomery bus law. d. Litle Rock 9 (Watch the Video): 9 African American teenagers who were apart of desegrating Central High School in Litle Rock, Arkansas. i.Governor’s Reaction: Against desgregation closed city's high schools to preven further integration and unrest, but was forced to reopen them and integration continued slowly. II. Page 3: Civil Disobedience (define): a. Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC): Goal was to use social activism and civil disobedience to demand an end to segregation in all areas of life.

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