111_Lab 1 - Name Section Lab Date Mon Sept 201 Due Date Mon Sept 1 201 Lab Date Tues Sept 201 Due Date Tues Sept 201\/ab Date Wed Sept 201'ue Date Wed

111_Lab 1 - Name Section Lab Date Mon Sept 201 Due Date Mon...

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Name____________________________________________ Section #_______ Lab Date: Mon., Sept. , 201 Due Date: Mon., Sept. 1 , 201 Lab Date: Tues., Sept. , 201 Due Date: Tues., Sept. , 201 /ab Date: Wed., Sept. , 201 'ue Date: Wed., Sept. 1 , 201 /DE 'DWH 7KXU 6HSW 'XH 'DWH 7KXU 6HSW Physical Geography: Climatic Processes Lab (GEOG111) Fall 201 Lab#1: Representing Space and Time on the Surface of the Earth Introduction Geographic skills are founded on the basic ability to read and interpret maps. In this class, much of the information presented concerning the earth’s climate and its interactions are given in the form of a map. It is important, therefore, to be able to locate places on the globe and understand the spatial relationships that exist between diverse points on the earth’s surface. This first laboratory exercise is designed to acquaint you with some of the basic map reading and analysis skills. In particular, the goals of this lab are to (1) acquaint you with the concepts of latitude and longitude, (2) determine how to locate places on a map, (3) understand what a map scale is and what it means, (4) measure distances and directions on a map, (5) familiarize you with different types of map projections, and (6) understand what time zones are. Latitude and Longitude Where are You? In most cases, the answer to that question is given in terms of fixed and known locations: I am located six miles east of Memphis on Interstate 40” or “I am standing at the corner of Center Street and Second Avenue”. This assumes, however, that everyone knows where these fixed locations are. In the previous examples, it is assumed that you know where Memphis and Interstate 40 are or that you are familiar with the city streets. When we are dealing with the globe as a whole, we face the same problem in that we must define locations with respect to fixed reference points. If the earth were flat, these reference points might be the corners or the edges. But the earth is not flat; it is an oblate ellipsoida geometric figure that resembles a flattened sphereand therefore has no edges. To make life easier, we will assume that the earth is a perfect sphere. So what reference points can there be?
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Geography 111 Lab #1 2
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