{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

L05-2 - Waves for example water waves Waves are...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
    Waves for   example water   waves
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
    Waves are characterized by amplitude (how much is the  property changing?) , frequency (how fast does it change?),  and wavelength (what is the distance between successive  crests?) v= λν  (m/s) Velocity (v) Inverse time (1 s –1  = 1  Hz) Frequency ( ν ) Distance (m) Wavelength ( λ )
Background image of page 2
    Waves versus particles: waves are diffracted and particles aren’t!
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
    Thomas   Young   discovered   the   wavelike   nature   of   light   in   1801 . Young’s double slit  experiment revealed  interference patterns caused  by constructive and  destructive interference of  propagating light waves.
Background image of page 4
    James Clerk Maxwell showed that visible light is one type of  electromagnetic radiation. (other types include radio waves,  microwaves, x-rays etc.) His theory is referred to as Maxwell’s  theory of electromagnetism.    James Clerk Maxwell (1831- 1879)
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}