PART OF SPEECH - World Citi Colleges Bachelor of Science in...

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World Citi Colleges Bachelor of Science in Information Technology English E Part of Speech Submitted by: Sean Kyle A. Talavera BSIT-2ndyear Submitted to: Ms. Michelle Rodriguez
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PART OF SPEECH The different parts of speech are words that are classified according to their functions in sentences. There are eight parts of speech. They are: Noun, Pronouns, Verbs, Adjectives, Adverbs, Prepositions, Conjunctions, and interjections. NOUN Refers to name of people, animals, things, places, events, ideas and feelings. Examples: John, lion, table, Philippines, freedom, love. TYPES OF NOUN Common noun – name of people, animals, things, places that are not specific. Ex. man, mountain, city, ocean, country, building, girl. Proper noun - Specific name of people, places, animals and things. Ex. Mark, Mt. Everest, Manila, India, Jorge A. Abstract noun – nouns that can’t perceive with your five senses. Ex. Beauty, hatred, anger, Honor, Joy, Love.
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Mass noun- a nouns that cannot be counted. Ex. hair, rain, water, happiness. Count noun- a noun that can be quantified or counted with a number. Ex. Students, Chairs, table, apple. Concrete noun - things that you can experience through your five senses: sight, smell, hearing, taste, and touch. Ex. pillow, paper, car, perfume, jar. Compound noun - a noun that is made with two or more words. Ex. He always gets up before sunrise. I really could use an updated hairstyle. Please erase the blackboard for me. Collective noun - a noun that denotes a group of individuals. Ex. army, staff, team, Society, class.
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PRONOUN A pronoun is a word that substitutes for a noun or noun phrase. Ex. I, me, he, she, herself, you, it, that, they, each, few, many, who, whoever, whose, someone, everybody, we, us, ours, ourselves. We are going to church. Someone must be a leader. He is using the internet. TYPES OF PRONOUN Personal pronoun - can be the subject of a clause or sentence. They are: I, he, she, it, they, we, and you. Ex. They went to the store. Subject Pronoun - are often (but not always) found at the beginning of a sentence. More precisely, the subject of a sentence is the person or thing that lives out the verb. Object pronoun - indicate the recipient of an action or motion. They come after verbs and preposition (to, with, for, at, on, beside, under, around, etc.). Indefinite Pronouns - These pronouns do not point to any particular nouns, but refer to things or people in general. Some of them are: few, everyone, all, some, anything, and nobody. Ex. “Everyone is already here.”
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Relative Pronouns - These pronouns are used to connect a clause or phrase to a noun or pronoun. These are: who, whom, which, whoever, whomever, whichever, and that. Ex. “The driver who ran the stop sign was careless.” Intensive Pronoun - These pronouns are used to emphasize a noun or pronoun. These are: myself, himself, herself, themselves, itself, yourself, yourselves, and ourselves.
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