Paradise Lost - Book 4 - The Argument Notes

Paradise Lost - Book 4 - The Argument Notes - / _ Lay...

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Unformatted text preview: / _ Lay pleasant. his grievd look he fixes sad. Panda L051 Sometimes towards Heav‘n and the full-blazing Sun, BOOK 4 Which now sat high in his Meridian Towre: [ 30 1 THE ARGUMENT Then much revolving, thus in sighs began. mes Satan now in prospect of Eden. and nigh the place where he 0 thou that with surpassing Glory crownd, must now attempt the bold enterprize which he undertook Look'st from thy sole Dominion like the God q (and. . alone against God and Man, falls into many doubts with Of this new World; at whose sight all the Starrs no; (106": himself. and many passions. fear. envy. and despare; but at Hide thir diminisht heads; to thee I call, [ 35 ] (:3 length confirms himself in evil. journeys on to Paradise. But with no friendly voice, and add thy name whose outward prospect and scituation is diseribed. overleaps 0 Sun, to tell thee how I hate thy beams LL WM, the bounds. sits in the shape of a Cormorant on the Tree of That bring to my remembrance from what state \“W M life. as highest in the Garden to look about him. The Garden I fell, how glorious once above thy Spheare; MK: describ'd'. Satans first sight of Adam and Eve; his wonder at Till Pride and worse Ambition threw me down [40 ] m thir excellent form and happy state. but with resolution to Warring in Heav'n against Heav‘ns matchless King: gwd. work thir fall; overhears thir discourse. thence gathers that the Ah wherefore! he deservd no such return ,_\I Tree of Imowledge was forbidden them to eat of, under From me, whom he create}! what I was We “waan penalty of death; and thereon intends to found his Temptation, In that bright eminence, and with his good k; s gum. 4x439) by seducing them to transgress: then leaves them a while, to (\Upbraided none; “01' was his SBTViCe hard- l 45 l M (noel know further of thir state by some other means. Mean whilemli W What could be less then to afiord him praise, didan. Uriel descending on a Sun-beam warns Gabriel, who had in 0515 4 The easiest recompence, and pay him thanks, to; «your»? charge the Gate of Paradise. that some evil spirit had escap'd ‘5 W How due! yet all his good prov‘d ill in me. t-lz's N5 ow «Mi: the Deep. and past at Noon by his Sphere in the shape of a h I And wrought but malice; lified up so high good Angel down to Paradise, discovered afier by his furio l sdeind subjection. and thought one step higher [ 50 ] gestures in the Mount. Gabriel promises to find him ere Would set me highest. and in a moment quit morning. Night coming on. Adam and Eve discourse of going The debt immense of endless gratitude, to thir rest: thir Bower describ'd; thir Evening worship. So burthensome, still paying. still to ow; Gabriel drawing forth his Bands of Night-watch to walk the Forgetful what from him I still receivd, round of Paradise. appoints two strong Angels to Adams And understood not that a grateful mind [ 55 ] Bower. least the evill spirit should be there doing some harm By owing owes not, but still pays, at once legs M: h to Adam or Eve sleeping; there they find him at the ear of Eve. lndebted and dischargd: what burden then? 6.. 6‘”: ask.“ N3 tempting her in a dream. and bring him. though unwilling. to 0 had his powerful Destiny ordaind . 2 . M Gabriel; by whom question‘d. he scornfully answers, prepares Me some inferiour Angel. I had stood S i a “ E” ‘n ) resistance. but hinder‘d by a Sign from Heaven. flies out of Then happie; no unbounded hope had rais'd [60 ]°£“~'\§r\“’.""~L Paradise. S I hots Cd- Ambition. Yet why not’?_som other Power As great might have aspir'd, and me though mean 0 For that warning voice. which he who saw? . Drawn to his part; but other Powers as great - Th' Apocalyps. heard cry in Heaven aloud. m‘ (M? Fell not. but stand unshak'n, from within MI Then when the Dragon, put to second rout. Econ-l “it” 5 Or from without. to all temptations arm'd. [ 65 ] m _ Came furious down to be reveng'd on men. inwér' Hadst thou the same free Will and Power to stand. h Vim!“ + Thou hadst: whom hast thou then or what to accuse, t‘.;wv§i&m_$ug We to the inhabitants on Earth! that now. [ 5 ] But Heavlns free Love dealt equally to all? flog. a“ 1 While time was. our first-Parents had bin warnd The coming of thir secret foe. and scap'd Mel Be then his Love accurst, since love or hate. Haply so scap'd his mortal snare; for now Wm Ste “5 To me alike, it deals eternal woe. [ 7O ] Satan. now first inflam'd with rage. came down. WIN“ I i Nay curs'd be thou; since against his thy will The Tempter ere th' Accuser of man-kind. [ lO 1 M Chose freely what it now so justly rues. S i E H “26 ' ' h' l Memiserabl! h‘ h h Ill ' To wreck on mnocent frail man as 055 e w to way 5 a the HI.“ u. OHM first Bartel. and his flight to Hell: Infinite wrauth, and infinite despaire? , Yet not rejoycing in his speed, though bold. Which way I flie is Hell; my selfam Hell; [ 75 M ‘l Dotsonl And in the lowest deep a lower deep u M 5- ax Farofi'and feulessnorwith causetoboast. msfisdirememptwhichnighfliebnth [ 15] Now rowling. boiles in his tumultuous brest. Still threatning to devour me opens wide,va immmc To which the Hell I suffer seems a Heav‘n. Vic “DA \5 ’MS'td-Q m 5k: . devillish Engine back recoiles 0 then at last relent: is there no place NM. Left for Repentance, none for Pardon lefi? [ 80 ] Upon himself: horror and doubt distract Hi Md droughts, and from the bottorn stirr None left but by submission; and that word The Phil within him. for within him Hell [ 20 ] Disdain forbids inc. and my dread of shame a. m ma rand about him. not from Hell Among the Spirits beneath, whom I seduc‘d mwmmflmfim himselfmfly With otherpromises and other vaunrs wmgfpmNchmsciencewakes Thentosubmit. boastinglcould subdue[85] Tu M writes the bfler neurotic Th' Omnipotent. Ay me, they little know Uflhmvvhlhndwhxnmstbens Howdearlylabidefltatboastsovaine, demm Mariam. Underwhattorments inwardly I groane: WM Eden which now in his View While they adore me on the Throne ofl-Iell, / ’ With Diadem and Sceptre high advanc'd 90 x; n q .35 ' ‘ The lower still 1 fan, onely supream [ 1 {JL M When God hath showrd the earth. so lovely seemd 1 . . _ , _ _ N I, S Submg to That Lantskip: And of pure now purer aire W; w 5;; Mt, W Meets his approach. and to the heart inspires " say 1 con repen an con 0 taine (82" ‘ V 1d 1' l ' B Act fG NC [k UM“ ema e lgtt andJoy. able to drive [ [55 ] y 0 face my former State; hOW soon W3 All sadness but despair: now gentle gales ngg'g‘gmg'lhleh thoughts, how 500" U115“ [ 95 ] Fanning thir odoriferous wings dispense vows mfg“: i3“ [PISSIOD‘SworeI case would recan mm mm Native perfumes. and whisper whence they stole For n P31“, 25 Violent and VOId. yum 5 “im an)“ Those balmte spodes. As when to them who satle ever can true reconcrlement grow N M W ’ Beyond the Cape ot‘liope. and now are past l I“) l “m?” W°und5 of deadly hate have peirc‘d so eep: mo Mozantbic. ottat Sea Nortlt-Ettst windes blow MM] “9"” bm lead me to a Worse I“lapse? l 100 ] qu Sabean Odours from tlte spicie shoare And hetherfall: so should 1 Purchase 8 W his Of Arabic tlte blest. with such delay Sh?” m‘emlssmn bought with double smart. NS mum Well pleas'd they slack thir course. and many a League rhyhpuniShIeI;r therSforc as fart Chenr'd with the grateful smell old Ocean smiles. | 103 1 mg 68* as 0m egglng Peace: A o baht So entertaind those odorous sweets the Fiend All hope excluded thus, behold in stead [ 105 ]§§Thigfi but: Who came thir bane, though with them better plcm‘d Of us out-casts eXil'd, his new delight. Wmfiw Then Asmodcus with the lishie tunic. Mankind created, and for him this WoriXWW WWW That drove him, though enumottrd, li'otn the Spouse so farewe' HOPE, Why, NM dbw Of Tobits Son, and with it vengeance sent l 170 ] FWUWMWSIEH swam; From Media post to rligypt. lhcrc l‘ztst hound Ewl be thou my Good; by thee at east 0 0 WI Divided Empire with Heav'ns King I hold “WM CW5 Now to th' ascent OfIhut slccp snvngc llill By thee, and more then half perhaps will reignel‘flmm Satan had journied on, pensive and slow, As Man ere long, and this new World shall know. But further way found none. so thick emu m'd. Nfimi _ As one continu‘d brake. the undergrowth [ lTS ] Thus while he spake, each passion dimm'd his face Of shrubs and tangling bushes hnd pctplcu Thrice chang'd with pale, ire, envie and despair, [ 5 roman). All path of Man or Beast that past that we) “ Wh' h d h' - - , . . f3 tc marr ts borrow'd Visage, and betratd “mm One Gate there only “as. and that look cl l A)! W , Him counterfet, if any eye beheld. \‘m~ NV“ On th‘ ofher Side: which when th' melt-fella" um For heav'nly mindes from such distempers foule W03,¥5fi& Due entrance he disdaind. and in Conlcmpt, | tso ] Are ever cleer. Whereof hee soon aware, Mtg/ammo. dished—m At one slight bound high over Icap'd all bound ‘1') Each perturbation smooth'd with outward calme, [ 120 ] Of Hill or highest Wall. and sheet u llhln Aflificel' Offi‘aUd; and was the first Lights on his feet. As when n prowling \h'oltt’,’ “MB “‘3 9‘5"”; That practisd falshood under saintly shew, Whom hunger drives to seek new haunt tot nth, ‘W Deep malice to conceale, couch‘t with revenge: Watching whch Shepherds pen lhll‘ Fir-cits at one [ Iti‘ 1 Yet not anough had practisd to deceive ln hurdl'd Cotes amid the field secure. Uriel once wamd; whose eye pursu'd him down [ I25 ] Leaps do: the fence with ease min the [hold The way he went, and on th' Assyrian mount Or as a want to unhmrd the cash Saw him disfigur’d, more then could befall Of some rich Bigger. Whose substantial dnrcs. Spirit of happie sort: his gestures fierce Cross-band and bolted fast. fear on assault, l lle 1 He markd and mad demeanour, then alone, In at the window climbs. or o'rt: the him. As he suppos'd all unobserv'd, unseen. [ 130 ] So clomb this first grand lhtcf into Gods l mild , Mgfi'mfi I So on he fares, and to the border comes So since into his Church lewd Hlfcltngj eltmhr fly Of Eden, where delicious Paradise, Thence up he flew. and on the Tree of Mr. V \ Now nearer, Crowns with her enclosure green, The middle Tree and highest there that gnu. [ 19‘ 1 As with a rural mound the champain head Sat like a Cormorant; yet not true Life Of a steep wilderness, whose hairie sides [ I35 ] Thereby rcgaind. but sat devising [hath With thicket overgrown, grottesque and wilde, To them who liv‘d; nor on the venue thought Access deni'd; and over head up grew Of that life-giving Plant, but only us'd lnsuperable highth of lofiiest shade, For prospect. what well us'd had bin the pledge l 200 1 Cedar, and Pine, and F in', and branching Palm Of immortality. 50 little knows A Silvan Seene, and as the ranks ascend [ I40 ] Any, but God alone. to value right Shade above shade, a woodie Theatre The good before him. but perverts best things Of stateliest View. Yet higher then thir tops To worst abuse. or to thir meanest use The verdurous wail of paradise up sprung: .. “‘6 AM Beneath him with new wonder now he views 1 205 1 Which to our general Sire gave prospect large %)m To all delight of human sense cxpos'd Into his neather Empire neighbouring round. [ 145‘ mum‘s-7 exan ln narrow room Natures whole wealth. yea me. Md “8"” the“ that wall 5" CiI’CIing row at SW3 he".va A Heaven on Earth. for blissful Paradise Of goodliest Trees loaden with fairest Fruit, CM mg“ of God the Garden was. by him in the Eat Blossoms and Fruits at once of golden hue Of Eden planted; Eden stretchd her Line 1 2l0 ] Appeerd, with gay enameld colours mixt: From Auran Eastward to the Royal Town On which the Sun more glad impress'd his beams 1 150 ] Of Great Seleucia, built by Grecian Kings, Then in fair Evening Cloud, or humid Bow, Or where the Sons of Eden long before Dyvelt in Telassar: in this pleasant soile Hrs farr more pleasant Garden God ordaind; [ 2l5 ] Out of the fertil ground he caus'd to grow All Trees of noblest kind for sight, smell, taste; And all amid them stood the Tree of Life. High eminent, blooming Ambrosial Fruit Of vegetable Gold; and next to Life [220 ] /‘ fi Our Death the Tr rew fast by. Knowledge of Good bought dear by knowing ill. Southward through Eden went a River large. Nor chang'd his course, but through the shaggie hill Pass'd underneath ingulft, for God had thrown [ 225 ] That Mountain as his Garden mould high rais'd Upon the rapid current, which through veins Of porous Earth with kindly thirst up drawn, Rose a fresh Fountain, and with many a rill Waterd the Garden; thence united fell [ 230 ] Down the steep glade, and met the neather Flood, Which from his darksom passage now appeers, And now divided into four main Streams, “Q, Runs divers, wandring many a famous Realme sure-35°" (\3 And Country whereof here needs no account, [ 23%flor 5 $0»th But rather to tell how, imam c/ Pf” ,w W How from that Saphire Fount the crisped Brooks, Rowling on Orient Pearl and sands of Gold, With mazie error under pendant shades Ran Nectar, visiting each plant, and fed [240 ] Flours worthy of Paradise which not nice An In Beds and curious Knots, but Nature boon Powrd forth profuse on Hill and Dale and Plaine, Both where the morning Sun first warmly smote The open field, and where the unpierc't shade [ 245 ] Imbround the noontide Bowrs: Thus was this place, A happy rural seat of various view; Groves whose rich Trees wept odorous Gumms and Balme, Others whose fi'uit bumisht with Golden Rinde Hung amiable, Hesperian Fables true, [ 250 ] if true, here only, and of delicious taste: Betwixt them Lawns, or level Downs, and F locks Grasing the tender herb, were interpos'd, Or palmie hilloc, or the flourie lap Of som irriguous Valley spred her store, [ 255 ] Flours of all hue, and without Thorn the Rose: Another side, umbrageous Grots and Caves Of coole recess, o're which the mantling vine Layes forth her purple Grape, and gently creeps Luxuriant; mean while murrnuring waters fall [ 260] Down the slope hills, disperst, or in a Lake, That to the fringed Bank with Myrtle crownd, Her Chrystal mirror holds, unite thir streams. The Birds thir quire apply; aires, vernal aires, Breathing the smell of field and grove, attune [ 265 ] The trembling leaves, while Universal Pan Knit with the Graces and the Hours in dance Led on th' Eternal Spring. Not that faire field Of Enna, where Proserpin gathering flours Her self a fairer Floure by gloomie Dis [270 ] Was gatherd, which cost Ceres all that pain To seek her through the world; nor that sweet Grove Of Daphne by Orontes, and th' inspir'd Castalian Spring, might with this Paradise Of Eden strive; nor that Nyseian lie [ 275 ] Girt with the River Triton, where old Cham, Whom Gentiles Ammon call and Lybian love. Hid Amalthea and her Florld Son Young Bacchus from his Stepdume Rhea's eye: Nor where Abassin Kings thir issue Guard, 1 280 ] Mount Amara. though this by tom auppos'd True Paradise under the Ethlop Line W By Nllus head. enelosd with shining Rock. MM“ “N. A whole daysjoumy high. but wide remote +1) V” (10‘ From this Assyrian Garden. where the Fiend [ 285 ] Saw undelighted all delight. all kind Of living Creatures new to sight turd strange: Two of far nobler shape erect and tall. Godlike erect. with native Honour clad ln naked Majestic seemd Lords oi‘ull, [ 290 ] And worthie seemd, for in thir looks Divine The image of thir glorious Maker short. Truth. wisdorne, Sanctitude severe and pure. Severe but in true filial freedom plac't: erence true autority in men; though both l 295 I Not equal. as thir sex not equal seemd; For contemplation hee and vulour fonnd, For softness shee and sweet attractive Grace. Hee for God only. slree__l‘or Godjn him: His fair large Front nTrd liyc sublime dcclur’d [ 3th ] Absolute rule; and llyacinthin Locks Round from his parted forclock manly hung C lustring, but not beneath his shoulders broad: w} chm 5Q Shee as a vail down to the slender waste Her unadorned golden tresscs wore l 305 l W Disheveld. but in wanton ringlcts war-"d As the Vine curlcs her tcndrils. which impli'd h Subjection. but requir'd with gentle sum), ,6); And by her yielded. bv him best rec itd, / WQLW‘ Yielded with co ' submission. modest pride. I Rift 1 is“ And sweet reluctant amorous delay. {k W i Nor those mysterious parts were then Conccald. Then was not guiltic shame, dishonest shame Of natures works. honor dishonorable. Sin-bred, how have ye troubl'd all mankind [ ,ii‘ ] With shews instead. mccr shows of seeming putt. And banisht from mans life his happth ltic. Simplicitie and spotless innocence. So passd they naked on. nor shund the sight OfGod or Angel. for they thought no ill" I .120] So hand in hand they passd. the lovlicst pair That ever since in loves imbraccs met. Adam the goodlicst man of men since home His Sons, the fairest ofhcr Daughters live. Under a lull ofshade that on a green I 325 ] Stood whispering soft, by a fresh Fountain side They sat them down, and after no more toil Of thir sweet Gardning labour then suflic'd To recommend coole Zephyr. and made case More caste, wholsom thirst and appetite! 330 i More grateful, to thir Supper Fruits they fell. Nectarine Fruits which the compliant boughcs Yielded them, side-long as they sat recline On the soil downie Bank damaskt with flours: The savouric pulp they chew, and in the rinde [ 335 | Still as they thirsted scoop the brimming stream: Nor gentle purpose, nor endearing smiles Wanted, nor youthful dalliance m beseemn Fair couple, Iinkt in happie nuptial League. Alone as they About them frisking playd[ 340 ] All Beasts ofth' Earth. Since wilde, and ofall chase ln Wood or Wilderness. Forrest or Den: Sporting the Lion rampd. and in his paw 0-40 Dandl'd the Kid; Bears, '1 “D Gambold before them, uihiffiéfifiifigfi 345%???“ ‘m _ - \5 To make them mtnh us'd all his might, and wreathd m") HIS Lithe Proboscis; close the Serpent sly insinuating, wove with Gordian twine Hts breaded train, and of his fatal guile Gave proof unheeded; others on the grass [ 350 ] Coucht. and now fild with pasture gazing sat, Or Bedward ruminating: for the Sun Declin'd was basting now with prone carreer To th' Ocean lles, and in th' ascending Scale Of Heav'n the Starrs that usher Evening rose: [ 355 ] When Satan still in gaze, as first he stood. Scarce thus at length faild speech recoverd sad. 0 Hell! what doe mine eyes with griefbehold, 3039‘“ 'J 3 Into our room of bliss thus high advanc’t k W Creatures of other mould. earth-bom perhaps, [ 360 ] W Not Spirits, yet to heav'nly Spirits bright Little inferior; whom my thoughts pursue With wonder, and could love, so lively shines In them Divine resemblance, and such grace The hand that formd them on thir shape hath pourd. [ 365 ] Ah gentle pair, yee little think how nigh Your change approaches. when all these deli Will vanish and deliver ye to woel More woe, the more your taste is now ofjoy; Happie, but for so happie ill secur'd [ 370 ] Long to continue, and this high seat your Heav'n lll fenc't for Heav’n to keep out such a foe As now is cntcrd; yet no purpos'd foe To you whom I could pittie thus forlome Though I unpittied: League with you I seek, [ 375 J And mutual amitie so streight, so close. That I with you must dwell, or you with me Henceforth; my dwelling haply may not please t.> M '5 Like this fair Paradise, your sense, yet such f {3 WWW Accept your Makers work' he ave it me, [ 380 ] - Which I as m. who“ ‘0“ § To entertain you two, her widest Gates, w And without whom am to no end, my Guide And send forth all her Kings; there will be room, ‘ And Head, what thou hast said isjust and right. (1°C; Q5 Not like these narrow limits, to receive “\3 We WM For wee to him indeed all praises owe, M mum (Lo Your numerous ofspring; if no better place, [ 385 ] (om-H) {at And daily thanks, i chiefly who enjoy [ 445 Jumped: RMB'iolcl Thank him wlio puts me loath to this revenge So farr the happier Lot, enjoying thee On you who wrong me not for him who wrongd. Praeminent by so much odds, while thou And should I at your harmless innocence Like consort to thy self canst no where find. Melt, as l doe, yet public reason just, That day I oft remember, when from sleep Honour and Empire with revenge enlarg'd, [390 ] I first awak't, and found my self repos'd [450 ] By conquering this new World, compels me now Under a shade of flours, much wondring where To do what else though damnd I should abhorre. And what l was, whence thither brought, and how. Not distant far from thence a munnuring sound Of waters issu'd from a Cave and spread Into a liquid Plain, then stood unmov‘d [ 455 ] Pure as th' expanse of Heav'n; l thither went With unexperienc't thought, and laid me downe On the green bank, to look into the cleer Smooth Lake, that to me seemd another Skie. As I bent down to look, just opposite, [460 ] A Shape within the watry gleam appeard By word or action markt: about them round M A Lion now he stalkes with fierie glare, gills-03m g : mirth Then as a Tyger, who by chance hath spi‘d In some Purlieu two gentle F awnes at play, ' Strait couches close, then rising changes oft [405 ] is couchant watch, as one who chose his ground Whence rushing he might surest seize them both Gript in each paw: when Adam first of men To first of women Eve thus moving speech, Tumd him all care to hear new utterance flow. [410 ] Sole partner and sole part of all thesejoyes, Dearer thy self then all; needs must the Power That made us, and for us this ample World 5% Be infinitly good, and of his good 90km VLI-hN‘M-SH ’ As liberal and free as infinite, [415 ] That rais'd us from the dust and plac't us here In all this happiness, who at his hand Have nothing merited, nor can performe Aught whereof hee hath need, hee who requires From us no other service then to keep [ 420 ] This one, this easic charge, of all the Trees in Paradise that bear delicious fruit MM Mus) So various, not to taste that onely Tree w Mu; Of knowledge, planted by the Tree of Life, 4% Som dreadful thing no doubt; for well thou knowst Wwotl God hath pronounc't it death to taste that Tree, quWldm The only sign of our obedience lefi Among so many signes of power and rule “3 WHO" Conferrd upon us, and Dominion giv‘n [430 ] Over all other Creatures that possess Earth. Aire, and Sea. Then let us not think hard One easie prohibition, who enjoy Free leave so large to all things else, and choice Unlimited of manifold delights: [435 ] But let us ever praise him, and extol] His bountie, following our delightful task To prune these growing Plants, and tend these Flours, Which were it toilsom, yet with thee were sweet. To whom thus Eve repli'd. O thou for whom [ 440 ] And from whom I was forrnd flesh ofthy flcsh. ’ 5w, DRMVAS So spake the Fiend, and with necessitie, The Tyrants plea, excus'd his devilish deeds. Then from his lottie stand on that high Tree [ 395 ] Down he alights among the sportfiil Herd Of those fourfooted kindes, himself now one, Now other, as thir shape servd best his end Neerer to View his prey, and unespi'd To mark what of thir state he more might learn [ 400 ] me‘us So neer grows Death to Life, what ere Death is, [ 425 ] w_\_w§ ...
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2008 for the course ENG 102 taught by Professor Garner during the Spring '07 term at SUNY Rockland.

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Paradise Lost - Book 4 - The Argument Notes - / _ Lay...

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