Grapes of Wrath - Spencer Stewart English 101 : Section 155...

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Spencer Stewart English 101 : Section 155 Jacob Witt The Grapes of Wrath In the fifth chapter of The Grapes of Wrath Steinbeck forces the reader to look upon the American economy during the Great Depression as an insatiable monster through his use of metaphors. The banks sent out their representatives to speak to the tenants. The representatives checked upon the soil and spoke with the tenants about what to do with it. Steinbeck never calls the tenants farmers implying that they are more than working on the land that they are of the land. Some of the owner men were kind, some angry, or indifferent, but none of them took responsibility for what they came to do. The owners say that The Bank or Company needs, wants, insists, or must have more profit. As though The Bank or Company were a living being with wants and needs. Steinbeck refers to The Bank or Company as a monster, a machine and master at the same time. This monster breathes profits and eats interest on money. The Bank, the monster, needs profits all the time. If it stops growing, if the economy stops growing, it will die. The owner men told the tenants that they would have to leave so they could hire one man to do
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Grapes of Wrath - Spencer Stewart English 101 : Section 155...

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