Chemical senses paper.edited - Running head CHEMICAL SENSES...

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Running head: CHEMICAL SENSES1Chemical SensesShawna PitzerPSY/34506,06,2016Alana Atchison
CHEMICAL SENSES2Chemical SensesTaste and smell work together in many ways as well as smell and memory are connected and works together in many respects as well. Smell and taste contribute to our enjoyment and desire to enjoy the pleasures of food and odors that may be comforting and alluring or unpleasantand disgusting that we come in contact with on a daily basis. How do we enter in contact with odors and taste, how do they work along with one another and what connects them to memory?Taste and smell are linked through a perception of chemicals that are emitted into the air. Although taste and smell are of separate organs, and they have their uses, they are very much related to one another. Without smell, we would find it quite difficult to taste the food we chose to eat; the taste buds only detect the food or chemicals within the food within our mouths. These little taste bud cells stimulate the receptors in the brain, the same area where odors are detected which allow us to describe the different flavors of the food.According to "The Whole Package: The Relationship Between Taste And Smell" (2007), "Smell, one of the five senses, is considered a "direct" sense (1). When something has a smell, it releases volatile molecules that float through the air to your nose (these molecules are able easilyto evaporate in the air and are therefore able to move easily and quickly). Within your nose thereare cilia, which are little hairs that increase the surface area of your nose so as to increase your smell perception. The molecules released from the object being smelled bind to the cilia, or chemoreceptors, where one of many neurons are triggered so that the sense of smell is perceived (2). Each of these neurons is called an olfactory receptor, and the thousands of them (an average of 10,000) contained in your nose each perceives a different odor (1). When a chemoreceptor is

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