propertyoutline#3 - 4LawSchool.com Outlines Bank OUTLINE...

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Unformatted text preview: 4LawSchool.com Outlines Bank OUTLINE DETAILS: Author: Bram School: Nova Southeastern University Course: Property Year: 2004 Professor: Ronald Brown Text: NA Text Authors: NA DISCLAIMER: This outline is written by a law student and it may contain some inaccurate information. 4LawSchool and its officers make no warranties as to the accuracy of the information this outline contains. This outline is provided as-is. Use it at your own risk, and do not rely on it for legal advice. Do not use this outline during exams if your law school or law professors do not permit usage of material that is prepared by others. This outline is copyright 2004 by 4LawSchool.com. A limited license for personal academic use is permitted. This outline may not be used for any other purpose and may not be posted on any other web site without permission. 1 Property, Nova Southeastern University, Professor Ronald Brown I. The System of Estates (Leaseholds Aside) Topic Notes: Estate: drawn from and implying status, signifies feudal origins of the system Freehold estates: normal tenures of feudal times Nonfreehold estates: mere leases Present interest in land: one person with a right to possession now Future interest in land: one person with a right to possession later Co-ownership/co-tenancy: two or more persons with rights to concurrent possession, now or in the future A. Possessory Estates 1. Up from feudalism Topic Notes: William the Conqueror (Normans) defeated Harold Godwinson in 1066, and thus the feudal system began A. Tenure Topic Notes: King William: fighters and priests should govern society, supported by a large mass of laborers. Central feature was land tenure. Positions determined in terms of relation to land. Subinfeudation: tenants in chief granting a parcel of land to a subtenant in exchange for the service of one or more knights or for some other service to support the land lord. Title of one tract of land might have looked as follows: KING --> TENANT IN CHIEF --> MESNE LORD --> TENANT IN DEMESNE tenant in demesne had seisin or possessory use of the land; lords above them had rights to services B. Feudal tenures and services 1) Free tenures Topic Notes: Three social tenurial structures to organize three social orders: men who fight, men who work, and men who pray a) Military tenures Topic Notes: Knight service: specified number of men who fight for the king for 40 days each year. Money payment soon took the place of this service and tenants by knight service lost their military function and slowly transformed into country gentlemen. Grand sergeanty: carried stuff for the king and officers, coronation services and the like b) Economic tenure (or Socage) 2 Topic Notes: To provide subsistence and maintenance for the overlords, the tenure of socage developed. Services rendered for tenure....
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propertyoutline#3 - 4LawSchool.com Outlines Bank OUTLINE...

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