2.1_pg46_57 - Colonial Resistance and Rebellion Terms Names...

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46 C HAPTER 2 Revolution and the E arly Republic One American's Story Colonial Resistance and Rebellion Crispus Attucks was a sailor of African and Native-American ances- try. On the night of March 5, 1770, he was part of a large and angry crowd that had gathered at the Boston Customs House to harass the British soldiers stationed there. More soldiers soon arrived, and the mob began hurling stones and snowballs at them. Attucks then stepped forward. A P ERSONAL V OICE JOHN ADAMS This Attucks . . . appears to have undertaken to be the hero of the night; and to lead this army with banners . . . up to King street with their clubs . . . . This man with his party cried, ‘Do not be afraid of them,’ . . . He had hardiness enough to fall in upon them, and with one hand took hold of a bayonet, and with the other knocked the man down. quoted in The Black Presence in the Era of the American Revolution Attucks’s action ignited the troops. Ignoring orders not to shoot civilians, one soldier and then others fired on the crowd. Five people were killed; several were wounded. Crispus Attucks was, according to a newspaper account, the first to die. The Colonies Organize to Resist Britain Because the Proclamation of 1763 sought to halt expansion by the colonists west of the Appalachian Mountains, it convinced the colonists that the British gov- ernment did not care about their needs. A second result of the French and Indian War—Britain’s financial crisis—brought about new laws that reinforced the colonists’ opinion. THE SUGAR ACT Great Britain had borrowed so much money during the war that it nearly doubled its national debt. King George III, who had succeeded his grandfather in 1760, hoped to lower that debt. To do so, in 1763 the king chose a financial expert, George Grenville, to serve as prime minister. Terms & Names Terms & Names MAIN IDEA MAIN IDEA WHY IT MATTERS NOW WHY IT MATTERS NOW King George III Sugar Act Stamp Act Samuel Adams Boston Massacre Boston Tea Party John Locke Common Sense Thomas Jefferson Declaration of Independence Conflicts between Great Britain and the American colonies escalated, until the colonists finally declared their independence. The ideas put forth by the colonists in the Declaration of Independence remain the guiding principles of the United States today. Crispus Attucks
A B By the time Grenville took over, tensions between Britain and one colony, Massachusetts, were on the rise. During the French and Indian War, the British had cracked down on colonial smuggling to ensure that merchants were not doing business in any French-held territories. In 1761, the royal governor of Massachusetts authorized the use of the writs of assistance, a general search warrant that allowed British customs officials to search any colonial ship or build- ing they believed to be holding smuggled goods. Because many merchants worked out of their residences, the writs enabled British officials to enter and search colonial homes whether there was evidence of smuggling or not. The mer-

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