Week7 Discussion Board - Class As this week's material has...

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Class - As this week's material has discussed databases are very common in today's systems. Please discuss your personal experience with database applications. What type of information has been stored in your databases?
Class - What is the difference between a text file and a binary file. Why would you ever use a binary file?A text file might be more recognizable in a text editor but that depends how it's encoded. Whereas, a binary file probably wouldn't be as easily recognizable. However, the underlying representation of the two is the same which is a sequence of bytes in a given order. Another difference may be the difference in buffering and the way that control characters are handled. What I'm understanding is you can read or write a text file in binary mode but if youread or write binary file in text mode you run the risk of corrupting the data, specifically the eof character that's usually at the end of text files. When you open a binary file in a text editor it will interpret the file as text and then display them. If the file isn't a plain text file then the results will be gibberish. I'm sure we've all seen this happen orhad this happen to us before when we try to open a file in Notepad and it shows a bunch of gibberish. However, the program is still doing it's job :) It's interpreting and outputting results. In regards to why we would ever use a binary file, well, for one because input and output is much faster when we use a binary file. Things like computer games run more smoothly. Computer games would run super slow if the data was stored in character form. Same

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