Week1 Discussion Board - Structured Versus Object-Oriented...

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Structured Versus Object-Oriented Design (graded) Structured and object-oriented designs are the two main contenders for programming methodologies relevant to the creation of documentation for application programs. The choice of methodologies will greatly affect how we approach the challenge and what programming languages we will have at our disposal. Based on this week's text chapter and some relevant web resources, as the discussion progresses, let us discuss the differences between structured and object- oriented designs and their merits and faults. Explain, in brief, what you learned from such readings. This section lists options that can be used to view responses. Responses are listed below in the following order: response, author and the date and time the response is posted. Collapse Mark as Unread Objects and Classes Professor Steelman Email this Author 4/23/2016 9:43:25 AM Class - This week we will be discussing structured and object oriented design methodologies. To start the discussion off lets discuss the basics of Object-Oriented design. What are Objects and Classes? How are they different. Please provide an example of both an object and a class. Collapse Mark as Unread RE: Objects and Classes Andrea Mcknight Email this Author 5/2/2016 1:29:07 PM Modified:5/2/2016 1:50 PM Ok so, according to the lecture this week, objects are units that contain the program code and the program that processes the data. Classes are groups of objects with similar characteristics. I'm not really sure about my explanation but I'm going to take a shot at it. I want to say that a class could also be defined as a generic set of instructions that we use to create objects with within a program where we can later on modify it to fit a specific need. An object would be the actual individual component thats being created, hence the difference. It is also my understanding that objects have certain properties or functions and can be made to do certain things. And before we can create an object we have to have a class and that's because an object comes from a class.(Webliography, Supplementary Reading, About Object-Oriented Programming) I would say an example of a class could probably be a camera. I say a camera because there are many different kinds of cameras that are the same make and model, that was built from the same set of instructions and have the same components. So in object oriented terms, my Canon camera belongs to a class of objects called cameras. I hope this makes sense.
Collapse Mark as Unread RE: Objects and Classes Matthew Devuono Email this Author 5/2/2016 2:33:51 PM I think you're spot on with it, Andrea. After referencing the tutorial within the lecture for this week, the narrator mentioned that the moniker and concept of 'Furniture' is the class where all objects like desks, chairs and sofas reside. Similarly, I view this class/object relationship like a grand jigsaw puzzle. Whereas the

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