Homework 3 Materials

Homework 3 Materials - Chapter 14 Sitecast Concrete Framing...

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Chapter 14 – Sitecast Concrete Framing System – Benjamin Boyd 1. The steps for pouring and finishing a slab on grade include first attaching a screed joints to stakes to interlock adjacent pours. Then a crushed stone layer is added for drainage. Next, asphalt-impregnated fiber board is applied to form a control joint for the slab. Then the concrete is poured and a motor vibrates is to allow the concrete to settle evenly. Some immediate smoothing is then done which is followed by hand or machine floating some cement paste to produce a even surface. The slab is then hand trowled and left to cure. 2. Some of the advantages of using insulated concrete forms are that they remain in place to protect the curing concrete and also act as an insulator for the wall post production. They are also easy to set up because they are made to fit together very quickly. 3. About 2ft is conventionally reinforced and about 1ft 3in if post tensioned.
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Chapter 15 - Precast Concrete Framing Systems – Benjamin Boyd 1. Precast members are produced in permanent forms referred to as casting beds. These beds are equipped with high strung steel rods that are used to cut the main cast into smaller pieces. At the fastest possible curing combination of materials, precast members can be made of a 24 hour cycle. 2. Some of the advantages of precast concrete is that it almost eliminated onsite casting a curing of construction members. Pieces are predesigned and shipped to the site and just require placement. There are usually made to fit into each other as well. One disadvantage however is that because precast members are already designed, designers are limited to single forms that may or may not inhibit their work. These members, even though light, are hard to transport because of their bulky size and usually require extensive trips from the factory to the site. They are also restricted in size to some degree because of this fact. 3. The depth of the precast solid slab will be around 6”. 4. Precast concrete members are joined in a variety of ways depending on the function of the conjoining members. Precasts are usually made with existing steel dowels that allow for joining to different members. These are then fastened together in a variety of ways that includes preexisting holes in the members and post joining grouting or polyurethane sealants.
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Chapter 16 – Roofing – Benjamin Boyd 1. Roofs that have a pitch of 3:12 are defined as steep roofs. These kinds of roofs can be constructed with materials such as shingles, architecture sheet metal and thatch. 2. Some sustainable concerns with low slope roofs include that is largely constructed with asphalt and oil based materials, that these materials exhume fumes that are harmful to the environment, some older buildings contain materials such as asbestos that are no longer used but still remain a concern, and that adhesive bonding gives of VOCs that ca pollute the air. Some concerns with steep roofs are that they employ asphalt shingles
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2008 for the course ARC 2461 taught by Professor Idontknow during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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Homework 3 Materials - Chapter 14 Sitecast Concrete Framing...

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